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Full text of "Catalogue .."

c 
BRENAU BULLETIN 

Volume VI Number 4 

THE LIBRARY 

OF THE 

IWMHMMTT W lW#m 

Brenau College 

Catalogue 
1915-1916 



Announcements 

for 

1916-1917 



June, Nineteen Hundred and Sixteen 



Published by Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga., four times a year (April, June, August and 
November.) Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at Gainesville, Ga. Under 
Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



1. Auditorium 

2. Bailey Building 
8. East Hall 

4. Yonah Hall 

5. Wilkes Hall 

6. North Hall 

7. Geiger Memorial 

8. Overton Hall 

9. Alpha Gamma Delta 

10. Model Home 

11. Alpha Delta Pi 

12. Dr. Pearce's Resl- 

13. Dr. Simmons' Resi- 

14. Alpha Delta Pi. 

15. Infirmary 

16. Zeta Tau Alpha 

17. Prof. J. H. Simmons 

18. Art Building 




19. Music Studio 

20. Prof. Sinnette 

21. Phi Mu 

22. Alpha Chi Omega 

23. Prof. Pfefferkorn 

24. Delta Delta Delta 

25. Prof. Michaelis 

26. The Country Club 

27. Dairy Farm, Barn 
and Three Cottages 

28. Simmons Memorial 



BRENAU COLLEGE 



GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA 
v 1 8 7 8 -- 1 9 1 6 * 



Catalogue 
1915 - 1916 



Announcements for 1916-1917 



Brenau College 
Brenau Conservatory 

Including : 

The Conservatory of Music 
The School of Oratory 
The Department of Art 



June, 1916 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



H. H. Dean, President 

John H. Hosch, Secretary 

M. C. Brown 

John Carter 

Z. T. Castleberry 

W. A. Charters 

S- C. Dunlap 

J. B. Gaston 

J. B. George 

E. E. Kimbrough 

Hayne Palmour 

H. J. Pearce 

H. H. Perry 

J. E. Redwine, Jr. 

T. J. Simmons 

Jno. A. Smith 

B. M. Stallworth 

G. W. Townsend 

U. R. Waterman 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, June 29, 1916 — Summer Term begins. 

Thursday, August 10, 1916 — Summer Term ends. 

Monday, September 11, 1916 — New students and Members of 
Faculty should arrive. 

Tuesday, September 12, 1916 — Fall Term begins. 

Classification Committee meets 9 A. M. Tuesday and 
Wednesday. 

Thursday, September 14, 1916, 11 A. M. — Formal Opening Exer- 
cises. 

Thursday, November 30, 1916 — Thanksgiving Day, Holiday. 

Thursday, December 21, 1916 — Christmas vacation begins, 4:30 
P. M. 

Tuesday, January 2, 1917 — College re-opens, 9 A. M. 

Tuesday, January 23, 1917 — Term Examinations begin. 

Tuesday, January 30, 1917 — Second Term begins. 

Thursday, April 5, 1917 — Easter Vacation begins, 4:30 P. M. 

Tuesday, April 10, 1917 — College reopens, 9 A. M. 

Friday, May 18, 1917 — Final Examinations begin. 

Sunday, May 27, 1917 — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday, May 28, 1917 — Address before the Phi Beta Sigma So- 
ciety. 

Tuesday, May 29, 1917 — Thirty-ninth Commencement, 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Haywood Jefferson Pearce, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
(A.B., Emory College; A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wuerzburg, The Sonbonne, College de France.) 
President and Professor of Psychology and Philosophy, 
Thomas Jackson Simmons, A.M., LL.D., 
(Wake Forest College) 
President and Professor of Education and Biblical Literature. 
Minnie Merritt, 
Professor of Ancient Languages. 
Edward H. Murfee, A.M., LL.D., 
(A.M., University of Alabama; LL.D., Wake Forest College; 
Bethel College) 
Professor of Physics and Chemistry. 

Eva Florence Pearce, A.B., A.M., 

(Brenau College, Columbia University) 

Professor of the English Language. 

James Henry Simmons, A.M., 

(Wake Forest College) 

Professor of English Literature. 

Samuel Gayle Riley, A.M., 

(Princeton University) 

Professor of History and Political Science 

Modesto Jacobini, A.B., 

(A.M., International College; Graduate Student Yale University, 

1911-1912; New York University, summer 1915.) 

Professor of Romance Languages. 

Herbert Daniel Williams, A.M., 

(University of Georgia) 

Professor of German. 

Josephine Schiffer, A.M., 

(Columbia University) 

Professor of Household Economics. 

George A. Bingley, A.M., 

(Princton University) 

Professor of Mathematics 

Ethel F. Wharfield, A.B., 

(Wellesley College) 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 



Ella Parker Leonard, A.B., 

(Wesleyan College; Graduate student, University of Tennessee) 

Instructor in English. 

Thomas Jefferson Pearce, A.B., 

(Emory University) 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Kathryn Lumpkin, A.B., 

(Brenau College) 
Assistant in English. 

Laura Harris, A.B., 

(Brenau College) 
Assistant in History. 

Otto W. G. Pfefferkorn, 
(New England Conservatory of Music, 1885; Student in Germany 

and France, 1891-1898) 
Director of the Conservatory of Music and Professor of Piano. 

Emil Bruno Michaelis, 

(Graduate of the Royal Conservatory of Leipsic) 

Professor of Violin and Harmony. 

John Townsend Sinnette, 

(Student under J. M. Barnes, Martin Krause, Conrad Ansorge) 

Professor of Piano. 

Benjamin F. Havens, 

(Pupil of Martin Krause) 

Professor of Piano. 

Carrie Sue Blocker, Mus.B., 

(Brenau Conservatory; Student, Cincinnati Conservatory; Pupil 

of Moszkowski, 1911-1912) 

Professor of Piano and Harmony. 

Neal McCay, 

(Pupil of Jean de Reszke, Sbriglia, Henschel, Vannucinni and 

William Courtney) 

Professor of Voice. 

Mortimer Wilson, 
(Chicago Conservatory; Pupil of Frederick Grant Dean, S. E.; 

Jacobsohn and William Middleschulte) 
Professor of Organ and Director of the Department of Theory 

and Ensemble. 



Louis Alberti, A.M., 

(Metropolitan College of Copenhagen; Pupil of Johann Barthol- 

dy, Sextus Miscow, Emilio Agramonte) 

Director of Vocal Department. 

Mrs. M. M. Childs, 

(Graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music; Pupil of 

F. F. Lincoln, G. E. Whiting and Stephen Emory) 

Assistant Professor of Piano. 

Mrs. Corinne Pearce Turnipseed, 

(Pupil of Hubert Clyde Linscott; Oscar Saenger) 

Instructor in Voice. 

Winnie Carter, 

(Graduate of Brenau Conservatory; Pupil of C. Frederick Bon- 

awitz) 

Instructor in Voice. 

Iona Peterman, Mus.B., 

(Brenau Conservatory) 

Instructor in Piano and Organ. 

Henry Stewart, 

(Brenau Conservatory) 

Instructor in Piano. 

Florence M. Overton, B.O. ? M.O., 
(B.O., Cleveland School of Oratory; M.O., Emerson College of 

Oratory) 
Dean of the School of Oratory and Professor of Public Speaking. 



Professor of Public Speaking. 

Edith F. Wharfield, A.B v 

(Wellesley College.) 

Instructor in Physical Training. 

John H. Weygandt, 

(Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts; Pupil of Jules Simon, 

Jacques Blanche) 

Professor of Drawing and Painting. 



Instructor in Arts and Crafts. 

Estil Blocker, A.B., 

Librarian. 



*To be elected. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Adam K. Geiger, 
Bursar. 

Mrs. Augusta Geiger 
Matron. 

Dr. Henry Latimer Rudolph 
College Physician. 

Mrs, C. C. Harrell, 
Intendant of Infirmary, 

Elizabeth Knauth 
Secretary to Dr. Simmons. 

Ruby Pratt Rivers, 
Secretary to Dr. Pearce. 

Nan Goodwin, 
Registrar. 

Velma Smith, 
Stenographer to the Dean. 

WlLHELMINA BaRRICK, 

Stenographer to the Bursar. 



CHAPERONS 



Mrs. E. P. Leonard, 
Yonah Hall. 

Miss Katherine Lumpkin, 
East Hall. 

Mrs. J. H. Weygandt, 
North Hall. 

Miss Minnie Merritt, 
Wilkes Flail 

Mrs. Irene Mason Starke, 
Delta Delta Delta. 

Miss Sallie Waddell, 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

Mrs. Ida Whitlock, 
Alpha Gamma Delta. 

Mrs. C. P. Turnipseed, 
Phi Mu. 

Miss Elizabeth Ragland, 
Alpha Delta Pi. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



Committee on Classification for the College: Riley, E. 
Pearce. Bingley, Williams. 

Committee on Classification for the Conservatory: Pfef- 
ferkorn, E. F. Pearce, Alberti, Michaelis. 

Committee on Discipline: E. F. Pearce, Leonard, Wey- 
gandt. 

Committee on Examinations for Scholarships: Riley, E. 
F. Pearce, Bingley. 

Committee on Library: J. H. Simmons, Riley, Merritt, Sin- 
nette. 

Committee on Student Organizations: Overton, Sails, 
Carr. 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds: Merritt, E. F. 
Pearce, Murfee, Riley, Leonard. 

Committee on Student Publications: Blocker, J. H. 
Simmons, Weygandt. 



Charter of Brenau 



GEORGIA, HALL COUNTY 

TO THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SAID COUNTY: 

The petition of H. J. Pearce, T. J. Simmons, T. J. Pearce, H 
H Dean, John A. Smith, J. E. Redwine, Jr., J. H. Hosch, Hayne 
Palmour M. C. Brown, J. C. Boone, E. E. Kimbrough, John 
Carter, Z. T. Castleberry, W. A. Charters, S. C. Dunlap H H 

l eT Z' l' ?/ Ge ° rge ' J ' B - Gaston > G " F - Turner > G. H. Prior, 
B. M. Stallworth and U. R. Waterman shows to the court the 
following facts. 

1. That petitioners are about to establish in the County of 
Hall, a college for the education of women, and pray the court 
for corporate authority to establish such college, to enforce good 
order, to receive donations, to make purchases and give obliga- 
tions in the name of said college until able to pay for the same, 
to effect all alienations of realty and personalty, not for the purpose 
of trade and profit, but for the purpose of promoting the Gen- 
eral design of such institution; that said collegte is to 
have no capital stock and no dividends shall be paid, and 
no profits derived therefrom; that the receipts from tuition or 
otherwise, shall be applied exclusively to the maintenance of said 
institution; repairing and improving the buildings and furnishing 
and equipping the same. 

2. Petitioners show that they are discreet and proper persons 
for such purposes. 

3. Your petitioners shows that the name and style of said col- 
lege shall be 

BRENAU COLLEGE. 

4. Your petitioners pray for all of the common powers incident 
to all corporations, viz.: to sue and be sued, to have and use a 
common seal, to make by-laws binding on their own numbers, not 
inconsistent with the laws of this State, or the United States; to 
receive donations of gifts, or will; to purchase and hold such 
property, real or personal, as is necessary or expedient for the 
purpose of their organization, and to do all such acts as are neces- 
sary or expedient for the legitimate execution of said purposes. 

10 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

5. Your petitioners pray for authority to appoint a Board of 
Trustees, or Advisers, to aid in the conduct and management of 
said college; to elect officers and teachers and fix their salaries, 
and to pay the same out of the collections, or otherwise. 

6. Petitioners pray for authority to issue diplomas and confer 
degrees, and to do all things necessary and proper in the conduct 
and management of such college. 

Wherefore, Petitioners pray for themselves and their legal suc- 
cessors corporate powers herein enumerated, and that a charter 
be granted them for a term of twenty years, with the privilege of 
renewal at the end of that time. 

H. H. DEAN, 
Petitioners' Attorney. 

The foregoing petition for charter being read and considered, 
and further being satisfied that the application is legitimately with- 
in the purview and intention of the Code as embodied in Section 
2351 of the Code of 1895, 

Therefore, It is hereby ordered, adjudged and decreed that the 
application of H. J. Pearce, T. J. Simmons, T. J. Pearce, H. H. 
Dean, John A. Smith, J. E. Redwine, Jr., J. H. Hosch, Hayne 
Palmour, M. C. Brown, J. C. Boone, E. E. Kimbrough, John Car- 
ter, Z. T. Castleberry, W. A. Charters, S. C. Dunlap, H. H. 
Perry, J. B. George, J. B. Gaston, C. F. Turner, G. H. Prior, 
B. M. Stallworth and U. R. Waterman, and their legal successors, 
be granted, and said college is hereby incorporated in the name 
and style of BRENAU COLLEGE with such corporate powers 
given and granted as prayed for and as may be suitable and not 
inconsistent with the laws of this State or violate of private rights. 

The charter this day granted to remain of force for twenty years, 
unless sooner revoked by law. 

It is therefore ordered that this petition and order be entered 
on the minutes of Hall Superior Court, and a certified copy of 
same, under seal of the court, shall be sufficient evidence in any 
court of the corporate powers and privileges so granted. 

This given under my hand and seal this 28th day of January, 

1911 * (Signed) J. B. JONES. 

Judge Superior Court, 
North-E astern Circuit, 
Presiding in Hall County. 
11 



BRENAU COLLEGE 



HISTORY 



Brenau College was first chartered in 1878 as the Georgia Bap- 
tist hemmary by the following persons: O. B. Thompson, J. W. 

« 3 ! ey ' ;«/ n C t ndler ' 1X E - Banks ' W - C - Wilkes, David E. 
Butler and W P. Price. 

Dr. W. C. Wilkes was the first president. 

After numerous vicissitudes the institution passed from denomi- 
national control and was placed under the management of private 
individuals. r 

The present period of growth and development began in 1893 
and during this period there has been a constant growth in num- 
bers and in equipment. 

The original plant consisted of what is now known as Wilkes 
Hall, a dormitory, and the Bailey Building, class rooms, located 
on a campus of nine acres. 

In 1893 the erection of Yonah Hall, the main dormitory, was 
completed. This work was done by contract by Allan D. Candler 
who later became Governor of Georgia. 

In 1896, partly by public subscription of the people of Gaines- 
ville, the Conservatory Building was erected. This contains a 
large auditorium and a number of lecture rooms, studios, practice 
rooms, etc. 

In 1902 East Hall, containing dormitory accommodations and 
a library and lecture room, was erected. The citizens of Gaines- 
ville subscribed about $4,000 to the building fund. 

In 1909 Overton Hall was erected. This building is the home 
of the Brenau School of Oratory, and contains studios, class rooms, 
a department library, practice rooms, etc. It was named by the 
students in honor of Miss Florence M. Overton, through whose 
efforts funds were secured for its erection. 

In 1910 North Hall was erected. This is one of the most at- 
tractive dormitories, providing accommodations for about 75 stu- 
dents. 

In 1912 Geiger Memorial was erected by an association com- 

12 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

posed of the colleagues of the lamented Dr. August Geiger, for 
many years head of the department of Theoretical Music. This 
building contains forty music studios, practice rooms, etc. 

The original campus of nine acres has been enlarged by the 
purchase from time to time of adjoining property, and a large 
tract across Pryor street from the main college buildings, and now 
includes approximately one hundred acres. 

Several club houses and other small buildings have been erected 
from time to time. 

A new building is now in process of erection, and a portion of 
it is ready for occupancy. The building is known as the Lessie 
Southgate Simmons Memorial, and will provide a permanent home 
for the Young Women's Christian Association, including a chapel 
for religious worship, rooms for the cabinet, Y. W. C. A. secre- 
tary, etc. This building also provides new and much enlarged 
quarters for the library, which has outgrown its original quarters 
in East Hall. The Museum will also be permanently and appro- 
priately installed in the new Memorial Building. 

The fund for the erection of this building began with a dona- 
tion of five thousand dollars by Dr. T. J. Simmons. About twelve 
thousand dollars additional was subscribed by members of the fac- 
ulty, citizens of Gainesville and friends and admirers of Mrs. 
Simmons in various sections. For the final completion of the build- 
ing, including the Y. W. C. A. chapel, the foundation of which is 
yet to be laid, about twenty thousand dollars of additional funds 
will need to be raised, and it is hoped that other friends of Brenau 
and of the lamented Mrs. Simmons will subscribe the necessary 
amount, and that students may have in the near future the use 
of the entire building as originally planned. 

COLLEGIATE STANDARDS. 

The development of the college in collegiate standards has been 
quite as marked and constant as has been the material development. 

In 1893, when the present era of development began, there were 
comparatively few high schools in the South, and standards of ad- 
mission were comparatively low, as was the case in all other col- 
leges for women in this section. It was not until the dawn of the 
present century that any very considerable advance in raising stand- 
ards was accomplished. 

13 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



In 1903 the unit system was adopted and one hundred and 
twenty unit hours was established as the standard \Zth of the 
eoNege course. But at that thne not more than two yeafs of hgh 

in iZ t r s ; e r red /°, r admission to the f ^^ ^ 

In 1908 the adoption of the Carnegie unit as a basis for entrance 
was first announced, and in 1909 the first attempt to apply the , 4 
unit standard was made. The number of four, ear £2 school 
m Georgia at that time was small, and the application of the 14 
unit rule was correspondingly difficult 

meS" of^iH* *7 f ^ th , ele h3S beCn a ~kable develop- 
ment of the high schools in the South and each vear has found 
the application of the standard less difficult. * 

In 1913 a change to a 15-unit standard, with a minimum of 
twelve units for conditional admission, was announced" the 

Eofii; f made neXt *" *" ^^ ° f - *» ^ ™ ^ 
The development of high schools and the corresponding increase 

of r t e h q eT:mber S if^T **?!* *" '^ * ^"^Z 
Ion. d students applying for preparatory courses In 

1909 the Preparatory School as a separate organization was dis 
con tlnue d, but number of a|0 cours f s off : r a e S d 7 v 

££ in Tune ,•« ? P r OSe ' Until thC Cnd ° f the "**£ 
wrdiscoSid ' ^ t,1C PrCParat0r - V W ° rk ° f the inStit »«- 



14 



General Information 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

There are now thirty-two buildings in use by the College, in- 
cluding the following: North Hall, Yonah Hall, Wilkes Hall, 
East Hall (residence halls), eight chapter houses and two club 
houses in use by the sororities, the Auditorium Building, Bailey 
Building (Academic), Overton Hall (Oratory), Geiger Memorial 
(Music), Art Building, Home Economics Building, The Infirmary, 
and ten buildings used as residences by teachers and officers and 
for music practice. The grounds comprise ninety-six acres, part 
of which consists of a natural park containing a lake and club 
house. 

LIBRARY 

The College Library is housed in the Lessie Southgate Simmons 
Memorial Building, which was erected in 1915, and consists of 
eight thousand bound volumes. A large number of periodicals is 
currently received. Students have access to the shelves during 
ten hours of the day and the Library is in charge of a trained 
librarian and assistants. 

THE GYMNASIUM 

Each student is required to take physical exercise in a well ap- 
pointed and equipped gymnasium. This work is done under the 
direction of a thoroughly trained instructor. 

A thorough physical examination is given each student and the 
kind and amount of exercise required is prescribed by the in- 
structor. 

Excuses from work in the gymnasium may be given only by the 
college physician or the gymnasium instructor. 

Y. W. C. A. BUILDING 

In many respects this will be the handsomest building on the 
campus, being constructed of Georgia marble and white silica 

15 



BRE N AU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

pressed brick. The estimated cost of the building complete is 
$35,000. 

It will contain a memorial chapel for the religious services of 
the Y. W. C. A.; also rooms for the cabinet, the secretary, the 
Biblical department, the library and the museum. 

LABORATORIES 

The Laboratories belonging to the Departments of Chemistry, 
Physics, Biology and Psychology are located in the Bailey Build- 
ing and are equipped with apparatus for individual work. The 
College has a very serviceable telescope, the gift of the class of 
1899, which is located in the observatory on the roof of the Audi- 
torium Building. 

THE MUSEUM 

The college owns a valuable collection of curios and objects of 
historical and artistic interest gathered from all lands. There 
is also a valuable collection of minerals and other geological speci- 
mens. The third floor of the new Simmons Memorial Building 
has been set apart for the museum. 

COSTUME DEPARTMENT 

A valuable and extensive collection of costumes, wigs, and aces- 
sories of every kind and representative of every period of history 
afford opportunity for study of these different periods. These 
costumes are also used by the dramatic department in the pre- 
sentation of the several interesting and instructive plays during 
the year. 

THE INFIRMARY 

The Infirmary is located near the northeastern corner of the 
Campus and is a light and cheerful building. It is in charge of 
an experienced nurse. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS. 

From time to time during the scholastic year, distinguished 
public speakers and artists are invited either by the College or 
by one of the student societies to appear before the college com- 

16 



BBENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

munity. Students are also permitted to attend, with proper chap- 
eronage, one or two performances of Grand Opera given annually 
by the Metropolitan Opera Company, of New York, in Atlanta, 
during the last week in April. During the year 1915-1916 the 
following lectures and recitals have been given in the College 
Auditorium. 

Honorable William Jennings Bryan 
"The First Commandment. " 

Honorable Hamilton Holt, Editor of the Independent 
"A World-Federation for Peace/' 

Honorable Theodore E. Burton, Former Senator from Ohio. 
"The Woman of Today." 

Honorable Philander P. Claxton, 

U. S. Commissioner of Education. 
"Some Lessons from the Great War." 

Miss Helen Keller 
"Happiness" 

Mr. Albert Spaulding, 

(Under the Auspices of the Orpheus Club) 

Violin Recital 

The Coburn Players 

(Under the Auspices of the Cushman Club) 

"The Yellow Jacket." 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The students maintain a number of organizations representative 
of various activities. The Athletic Association with its various 
branches is maintained. Brenau has two literary societies: Euzelian 
and Philomathesian. The Cushman Club is a society of Oratory 
Students. The Orpheus Club is a musical organization. The 
Phi Beta Sigma sorority is an organization of Junior and 
Senior students chosen annually by the College faculty for distinc- 
tion in scholarship. There are chapters, also, of six Greek letter 

17 



BBENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

sororities — Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Gamma Delta, Alpha Delta 
Pi, Delta Delta Delta, Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi Mu. 

The Zeta Phi Eta and the Mu Phi Epsilon fraternities are the 
honorary societies of the School of Oratory and the Conservatory 
of Music respectively. 

THE BRENAU CLUB OF ATLANTA 

An organization composed of some forty or fifty former stu- 
dents of Brenau now resident in Atlanta, Ga., is known as the 
"Brenau Colony. " The object of the organization is to further 
interests of "Alma Mater," and also to take some part in all 
movements among women for social and civic betterment. 

This organization meets monthly and the occasions are very 
pleasant, socially, and profitable otherwise. All former Brenau 
students who reside in or near Atlanta are invited to communi- 
cate with Mrs. Wm. Owens, the president, concerning the con- 
ditions of membership. 

Interest in the plans of this Colony on the part of Brenau stu- 
dents residing in other large cities has been expressed, and it 
seems probable that a number of Brenau Colonies will be orga- 
nized in the near future. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The following publications are issued by the student body: Bub- 
bles, the annual, a record of the chief events of the college year, 
now in its thirteenth year; The Brenau Journal, the monthly lit- 
erary magazine; The Alchemist, a weekly newspaper. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

Four bulletins are published at regular intervals each year. 
These include the college catalogue, a booklet descriptive of the 
College and its work, announcement of the summer school, and 
announcement of the spring term. 

Other bulletins are issued irregularly as occasion demands. 

GOVERNMENT 

The enforcement of college regulations is entrusted to a board 
of students appointed by the Students' Union, which includes all 

18 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

students, whose acts are reviewed by a faculty committee. This 
plan is the outgrowth of a system of government inaugurated in 
1898. and has abundantly justified itself. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Religious exercises are held daily at noon in the Chapel, and 
all students are required to be present. Voluntary religious meet- 
ings are held Sunday evening and at other times under the auspices 
of the Young Women's Christian Association of the College, 
which also conducts courses of Bible and mission study and co- 
operates with local organizations in charity work. Students are 
expected to attend the church of their choice on Sunday mornings. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

The social life of the students is a matter which the faculty 
considers of the utmost importance, and for which ample provision 
and careful regulations are provided. Some students prefer to 
reside in the residence halls, and for such the four halls, Yonah, 
Wilkes, North and East, have been built and furnished. Others 
prefer to reside in smaller groups and to these the College offers 
the opportunity of living in one of the several cottages. The sev- 
eral Greek letter sororities, the class organizations, state clubs, 
Y. W. C. A., and other organizations of a voluntary nature are 
active in promoting the spirit of comradeship among the students 

THE BRENAU LOAN FUND 

The Fund is established for the benefit of ambitious and talented 
students who may not be otherwise able to meet their college ex- 
penses. 

The Fund is designed to assist and not to support a student. 

Our task is to help those who will and can, in a measure, help 
themselves. Except in very rare cases no single student will be 
advanced from this fjund more than one-half the expense of board 
and tuition for each year of college residence. 

Those who desire to apply for help from this fund should fill 
out the following form and return: 

19 



BBENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President of Brenau: 

I hereby apply for a loan of to assist 

me in spending the next year in Brenau. I find that the expense 

for the course which I desire to take will amount to about $ 

and I can arrange to pay the balance, above the loan asked, 

in cash during the year. I expect to be able to repay the loan 
(when ?) 



Signed 

Name 

P. O. Address 

Parent or Guardian 

Name of last teacher 

Have you completed High School ? 

What course do you wish to pursue ? 

Name three references to whom we may write concerning you. 



State the reasons which prompt you to seek this loan 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College Scholarships, twelve in number, are offered upon 
competitive examination to members of the incoming Freshman 
Class. Their value is one hundred and fifty dollars each. The ex- 
aminations are held in approved high schools throughout the South 
about May 1st of each year. Correspondence with school prin- 
cipals or with students who may be interested is invited. 

The Faculty Scholarship, of the value of one hundred and fifty 
dollars, is offered by the College faculty to a student to be selected 
by a faculty committee upon the basis of scholastic and personal 
standing. 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

For the purpose of assisting ambitious students, and at the same 
time perfecting the college organization, a number of positions re- 
quiring service of one or more hours daily have been created. 

20 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

These positions are usually held by girls who are prominent in 
all student activities and who have the highest respect of the stu- 
dent body. This is partly due to the fact that a girl who is willing 
to work her way is usually a girl of more than ordinary ability. 

As is the case of applications for help from the loan fund, so 
must applicants for position as student assistant be able to provide 
funds for a part, usually at least a half, of the college expenses. 
On the other hand, those who are fully able to meet their expenses 
otherwise should not apply for these positions. The remuneration 
is based upon the amount of time required, estimated at twenty 
cents per hour. For two hours daily for the scholastic year the 
remuneration is usually $80.00. 

The positions are as follows: Eight monitors at $80.00 each, 
and one head monitor at $150; three assistant librarians at $80.00 
each; one postmistress, $80.00; one head bookstore clerk $150, 
and two assistants at $80.00 each; two office assistants to the 
Dean, two office assistants to the Secretary, two office assistants 
to the Bursar, one office assistant to the matron, two office assis- 
tants to the nurse, $80.00 each; three multigraph operators for 
the office, $80.00 each; one manager of the Y. W. C. A. tea room, 
$150. 

Applicants for the positions are required to fill out the following 
form: 

I hereby apply for a position as student assistant for the school 

year beginning 

and promise, if appointed, to discharge all duties of the position 
to the best of my ability and by precept and example to maintain 
and enforce all regulations of the college community. 

Name 

P. O. Address 

Parent or Guardian 

Address of last teacher 

Have you completed High School? 

What course will you pursue here? 

How many hours can you give to this service ? 

Name in order of preference positions desired ... 

State the reasons which prompt you to seek this position 



21 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

EXPENSES, REGULATIONS, ETC. 

The scholastic year is divided into two terms, each term con- 
sisting of eighteen weeks. No pupil is received for a shorter time 
than one term, and no money will be refunded should she withdraw 
before the end of the term. There is an obligation upon the insti- 
tution to furnish board and tuition for the term; there is a similar 
obligation upon the patron to continue his daughter in school 
until the close of the term. In case of illness, when the physician 
recommends that a student withdraw on that account and the stu- 
dent is absent from the college for one month or longer, the loss 
will be shared equally by the college and the patron. 

RATES OF TUITION FOR SCHOLASTIC YEAR 

Literary Tuition, A.B. course $ 80.00 

Literary Tuition, each 3-hour course 30.00 

Literary Tuition, each 1- or 2-hour course 20.00 

Piano, Pfefferkorn 100.00 

Piano, Sinnette, Michaelis, Havens 80.00 

Piano, Mrs. Michaelis, Miss Peterman, Miss Blocker, Mrs. 

Childs 60.00 

Piano, Assistants 50.00 

Voice, Mr. Alberti, Mr. McCay 100.00 

Voice, Mrs. Turnipseed, Miss Carter 60.00 

Voice, Assistants 50.00 

Pipe Organ, Miss Peterman 50.00 

Violin, Viola, Violoncello, etc 80.00 

Mandolin 40.00 

Guitar 40.00 

Oratory, class and private lessons $50.00 to 80.00 

Oratory, class lessons, each hour per week 10.00 

Physical Culture, special classes of twelve 20.00 

Physical Culture, individual lessons 40.00 

Art, China, Arts and Crafts, each 60.00 

Art, China, Arts and Crafts, (two courses) 90.00 

Theory and History of Art, each course 10.00 

Theoretical Courses in Music, each course 20.00 

Domestic Science (Cooking), each course 40.00 

22 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Domes-tic Art (Sewing), each course 30.00 

Use of Piano, one hour daily 6.00 

Use of Pipe Organ, one hour daily 30.00 

Incidental Fees 12.00 

Medical and Infirmary Fees 10.00 

Laboratory Fee 5.00 

Tool Fee,* Arts and Crafts 3.00 

RATES OF BOARD 

The rate of board is one hundred and sixty dollars. There are 
three dining-rooms, all served from the same kitchen. A charge 
of $1.00 per day will be made for students or teachers who remain 
through the Christmas or summer vacations. 

THE COST OF ROOMS 

This varies according to the location and conveniences furnished 
and the number of pupils who occupy the room. Large rooms ac- 
commodating four occupants, and small rooms for two occupant r 
cost $30.00 to $40.00 for each person per year. Other la 
rooms for two are provided at from $50.00 to $70.00 for 
person. 

Rooms en suite with private bath, hot and cold wa' 
provided at rate of $90.00 to $100.00, each person. 

Rooms in the chapter houses cost $60.00 each perso 
assignment of rooms in the houses is left with the governi: 
of the sorority in each house. 

Arrangements such as changing room for three to rooii 
two, or room for two into a room for one may be made, but 
such cases the charge for the unused space will be prorated amoi- 
the occupants of the room so changed. 

SPECIAL RATES 

Board, room selected by the College, regular literary course 
selected by the College and necessary fees for the scholastic year 
payable upon entrance, $250.00. 

The above and one extra, either Music, Art, Oratory, or Do- 
mestic Science, courses and teacher to be selected by the College, 
$300.00. 

23 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

The number of students who will be accepted at these special 
rates is limited, and the College reserves the right to discontinue 
the rate when this limit is reached. The regular five per cent, 
discount is not deducted from these special rates. 

Attention is called to the fact that under this rate rooms and 
teachers will be selected by the College, and the special rate is made 
because of the liberty to adjust these matters to suit the conven- 
ience of the College. The interests of the pupils are also con- 
sulted, of course, and there are no rooms which are not perfectly 
comfortable, nor any teachers who are not entirely competent. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

Sixty per cent, of the account for the entire year is due upon 
entrance in September, and the balance January 6th, following. 
If the exact amount can not be determined before entrance, a 
payment of one hundred dollars will be accepted, and statement 
for balance will be rendered and become due as soon as registra- 
tion is complete. If not paid within ten days, sight draft will be 
iwn. 
^he matriculation card will not be issued until payment of at 
ne hundred dollars is made. Check for this amount, made 
to Brenau College, should be mailed in advance or present- 
student in person when she arrives at the College, 
ts who enter January 6th for the Spring Term, will pay 
ent. of this price. 

DISCOUNTS 

fc discount of five per cent, will be made upon the rates above 
ioted if the entire account for the year is paid upon entrance. 
This discount will positively not be allowed unless the payment 
is made as indicated. The accounts of students who have re- 
ceived scholarships and of the students who are on the loan fund 
or who receive compensation as student assistants are not sub- 
ject to the above discount. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

A payment of $5.00 is required in order to secure reservation 
of a room. This amount will not be refunded under any circum- 
stances. 

24 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

In reserving room be sure to indicate how many roommates and 
what priced room is desired. The cheapest rooms are perfectly 
comfortable. 

Rooms are released on day of opening unless other date is 
specified in application. 

FEES 

The Medical Fee is required of all students who board in the 
College. This fee covers the cost of medical attention and the 
care of a nurse, together with such other attention as may be 
required, except in cases of protracted and dangerous illness, 
when a special nurse will be secured at the expense of the student, 
and if necessary a consulting physician may be engaged, also at 
the expense of the student. 

The Medical Fee does not include the cost of drugs, except or- 
dinary household remedies which are kept in the Infirmary. 

The Incidental Fee. This fee is required of all students — both 
boarding and day. It includes Library, Lecture Course, Physical 
Examination and general class in Physical Culture, and sub- 
scription to the College Journal. 

CONCERNING REDUCTIONS, CHANGES, ETC. 

No reduction made for pupils who enter within one month after 
the session opens. 

Scholarships and fellowships are good for one year only unless 
a longer term is specified in the appointment. 

After rooms have been selected or assigned, no reduction in 
charge will be made by reason of change in location of room. 

Daughters of active ministers (any denomination) who depend 
solely upon the ministry for support are charged no tuition in 
the Literary Department. 

No reduction will be made by reason of a change in the course, 
made during the term, and full charge will be made for said 
course to the end of the term. Changes in courses are permitted 
only after examinations at the end of each term, except by special 
permission and for urgent reasons. 

Claims for reduction on account of individual lessons missed 
by reason of a fault of the teacher, or otherwise, must be filed 
in the office immediately, in writing, otherwise the claim will not 
be recognized. 

25 



BRENAU COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Haywood Jefferson Pearce, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

President and Professor of Psychology and Philosophy. 

Thomas Jackson Simmons, A.M., LL.D., 

President and Professor of Education and Biblical Literature. 

Minnie Merritt, 

Professor of Ancient Languages. 

Edward H. Murfee, A.M., LL.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

Eva Florence Pearce, A.B., A.M., 

Dean and Professor of English Language. 

James Henry Simmons, A.M., 

Professor of English Literature. 

Samuel Gayle Riley, A.M., 

Professor of History. 

Modesto Jacobini, A.B., 

Professor of Romance Languages. 

Herbert Daniel Williams, A.M., 

Professor of German. 

George A. Bingley, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Josephine Schiffer, A.M., 

Professor of Household Economics. 

Ethel F. Wharfield, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Thomas Jefferson Pearce, A.B., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Kathryn Lumpkin, A.B., 

Assistant in English. 

Laura Harris, A.B., 

Assistant in History. 



Ad 



mission 



Students are admitted to the College either on satisfactory ex- 
amination in the required subjects, or on the formal certificate 
of the Principal of an "Accredited Secondary School." Students 
from other colleges and universities and adult special students 
are admitted in accordance with regulations stated on pages 34-35. 

Examinations for admission are given in May and in September. 
The examinations in May may be taken at the time of the final 
examinations in the various secondary schools of the South, and 
prospective students who wish to apply for admission on exami- 
nation should communicate with the Committee on Classification 
before May 1st. The examination in September is given only at 
the College. 

Admission by Certificate: Students will be admitted on certifi- 
cate who have completed a full course in a secondary school offi- 
cially accredited by the University of Georgia, or on presenting 
the prescribed certificate from a high school officially accredited 
by the State University of the State in which the school is located. 
The certificate must come from the principal or superintendent and 
not the applicant, indicating in each case what subjects have 
been studied, the time spent on each, the amount covered, and the 
grade received. Form for such certificates, prepared by the Col- 
lege, may be obtained by the applicant on request, or the blank 
furnished by the State University may be used. 

Admission to the Freshman Class: Fifteen units of preparatory 
work are required for admission to full standing in the Freshman 
class. Eight units are prescribed, as follows: English 3, Algebra 
1, Plane Geojnetry 1, One foreign language 2*, History 1. The 
remaining units up to fifteen are to be selected by the applicant 
from such of the subjects below as she has not already offered as 
a prescribed requirement. 

Conditioned Students: Students, who by examination, or by cer- 
tificate from accredited schools, can secure credit for twelve of the 
units required for entrance, will be admitted as conditioned Fresh- 
men. All conditions must be removed by examination at the college 
before the end of the student's Junior year. 

*If Latin is offered, three units. 

27 



BR EN A U C O L L E G E BULLETIN 



Entrance Subjects 



English 

Algebra 

Plane Geometry .... 
Plane Trigonometry . . 
Foreign Language . . . 

Latin 

French 

German 

Spanish 

Greek 

History 

Ancient History 

Mediaeval and Modern History 

English History 

American and Government . . 
Natural Science 

Physiology 

Physical Geography 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Zoology 

Botany 

Biology 

Agriculture 

Drawing 

Domestic Science 

*Music 



y 
y 
y 



4 

i 
y 



*For the Conservatorv. 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Definition of Entrance Requirements 



ENGLISH 

(Three units prescribed; four units accepted.) 

No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is notably 
defective in point of spellings punctuation, idiom, or division into 
paragraphs. 

Preparation in English has two main objects: (1) Command of 
correct and clear English, spoken and written, (2) ability to read 
with accuracy, intelligence, and appreciation. 

ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

The first object requires instruction in grammar and composition. 
English grammar should ordinarily be reviewed in the secondary 
school; and correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be 
rigorously exacted in connection with all written work during the 
four years. The principles of English composition governing punc- 
tuation, the use of words, paragraphs, and the different kinds of 
whole composition, including letter-writing, should be thoroughly 
mastered; and practice in composition, oral as well as written, 
should extend throughout the secondary school period. Written 
exercises should comprise narration, description, and easy expo- 
sition and argument based upon simple outlines. 

LITERATURE 

The second object is sought by means of two lists of books, 
headed, respectively, Reading and Study. 

1. Reading. The aim of this course is to foster in the student 
the habit of intelligent reading and to develop a taste for good 
literature, by giving her a first-hand knowledge of some of its 
best specimens. She should read the books carefully, but her at- 
tention should not be so fixed upon details that she fails to ap- 
preciate the main purpose and charm of what she reads. 

29 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



FOR READING 

Group I. — Classics in Translation. Two to be Selected. 

The Old Testament, comprising at least the chief narrative episodes 
in. Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, 
together with the books of Ruth and Esther; Homer's Odyssey, with 
the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, V, XV, XVI, 
XVII; Homer's Iliad, with the omission, if desired, of Books XI, 
XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Virgil's JEneid. The Odyssey, Iliad, and 
^neid should be read in English translations of recognized literary 
excellence. For any selection from this group a selection from any 
other group may be substituted. 

Group II. — Shakespeare. Two to be Selected. 

Shakespeare's Midsummer-Night's Dream; Merchant of Venice; As 
You Like It; Twelfth Night; The Tempest; Romeo and Juliet; King 
John; Richard II; Richard III; Henry V; Coriolanus; Julius Casar; 
Macbeth; Hamlet. 

N.B. — The last three only, if not chosen for study. 

Group III. — Prose Fiction. Two to be Selected. 

Malory's Morte d* Arthur (about 100 pages); Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress, Part I; Swift's Gulliver's Travels (Voyages to Lilliput and 
to Brobdingnag) ; Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; Goldsmith's 
Vicar of Wakefield; Frances Burney's Evelina; Scott's Novels, any 
one; Jane Austens Novels, any one; either Maria Edgeworth's 
Castle Rackrent, or The Absentee; Dickens's Novels, any one; 
Thackeray's Novels, any one; George Eliot's Novels, any one; Mrs. 
Gaskell's Cranford; either Kingley's Westward Ho! or Hereward the 
Wake; Reade's The Cloister and the Hearth; Blackmore's Lorna 
Doone; Hughes's Tom Brown's Schooldays; either Stevenson's 
Treasure Island, or Kidnapped, or The Master of Ballantrae; 
Cooper's Novels, any one; Poe's Selected Tales; either Haw- 
thorne's The House of Seven Gables, or Twice Told Tales, or 
Mosses from an old Manse; A collection of short stories by va- 
rious standard writers. 

Group IV. — Essays, Biography, etc Two to be Selected. 

Either the Sir Roger de Coverly Papers, or Selections from the Tatler 
and The Spectator (about 200 pages); Boswell's Selections from the 
Life of Johnson (about 200 pages); Franklin's Autobiography; 
either Irving's Selections from the Sketch Book (about 200 pages), 
or The Life of Goldsmith; Southey's Life of Nelson; Lamb's Se- 
lections from the Essays of Elia (about 100 pages); Lockhart's Se- 

30 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

lections from the Life of Scott (about 200 pages); Thackeray's 
Lectures on Swift, Addison, and Steele in the English Humorists; 
Macaulay: one of the following essays: Lord Clive, Warren Hast- 
ings, Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Frederic the Great, or Madame 
d'Arblay; Trevelyan's Selections from Life of Macaulay (about 200 
pages); either Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, or Selections (about 150 
pages); Dana's Two Years Before the Mast; Lincoln's Selections, 
including at least the two Inaugurals, the Speeches in Independence 
Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, and Letter to 
Horace Greely, together with a brief memoir or estimate of Lin- 
coln; Parkman's The Oregon Trail; Thoreau's Walden; Lowell's 
Selected Essays (about 150 pages); Holmes's The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast Table; Stevenson's Inland Voyage, and Travels with a 
Donkey; Huxley's Autobiography and selections from Lay Sermons, 
including the addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A Lib- 
eral Education, and A Piece of Chalk; A collection of Essays by 
Bacon, Lamb, De Quincey, Hazlitt, Emerson, and later writers; A 
collection of Letters by various standard writers. 

Group V. — Poetry. Two to be Selected. 

Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series): Books II and III, with 
special attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns; Pal- 
grave's Golden Treasury (First Series): Book IV, with special at- 
tention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley (if not chosen for study) ; 
Goldsmith's The Traveller, and the Deserted Village; Pope's The 
Rape of the Lock; A Collection of English and Scottish Ballads, 
as, for example, some Robin Hood ballads, The Battle of Otterburn, 
King Estmere, Young Beichan, Bewick and Grahame, Sir Patrick 
Spens, and a selection from later ballads; Coleridge's The Ancient 
Mariner, Christabel and Kubla Kahn; Byron's Childe Harold, Canto 
III or IV, and The Prisoner of Chillon; either Scott's The Lady of 
the Lake or Marmion; Macaulay's The Lays of Ancient Rome, The 
Battle of Naseby, The Armada, Ivry; either Tennyson's The Prin- 
cess, or Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing 
of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They 
Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts from 
Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, 
Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa — Down 
in the City, The Italian in England, The Patriot, "De Gustibus— ," 
The Pied Piper, Instans Tyrannus: Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, 
and The Forsaken Merman; Selections from American Poetry, with 
special attention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow, and Whittier. 



31 



BRBNAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



FOR STUDY 

Group I.— Drama. One to be Selected. 
Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet. 
Group II.— Poetry. One to be Selected. 

M !!t 0n ' S , L £! le ?, r0 ' - 11 Pens e r °so, and either Comus or Lycidas- Ten 
of Arthu^ThTT 2 Art , hUr ' The Ho, y Grail and the a p^Ir n n g 

r n f » ^a^^j^^ta She,le * 

Group III.— Oratory. One to be Selected. 

BU £\ Speech ^ on Conciliation with America; Macaulay's Two 
Speeches on Copyright, and Lincoln's Speech at Cooner Unio^" 

0?aS g ° n S FareWe " Addr6SS ' and WeVr'sFirinunke^Tli 

Group IV.— Essays. One to be Selected. 

Carlyle's Essay on Burns, with a selection from Burn's Poems- 
Macaulay's Lrfe of Johnson; Emerson's Essay ™„ Makers. * 

MATHEMATICS 

(Two units prescribed; three and a half accepted.) 

Algebra— (a) Elementary Algebra, including the elementary 
operations, solutions of single and simultaneous linear equations, 
factoring, radicals, exponents (both integral and fractional) and 
the solution of numerical quadratic equations (one unit). 

(b) Advanced Algebra. Based on above and in addition in- 
cluding solution of simultaneous quadratics, of problems whose 
solution depends upon quadration; the formation of equations 
into given roots; the binominal theorem for positive integral ex- 
ponents 5 practical use of logarithms; and ratio and proportion. 
(One unit additional.) 

Plane Geometry. Demonstrations, constructions and solutions 
(1 unST Pr ° blems ' aS S iven J" any standard Plane Geometry. 

Solid Geometry. A course in lines and planes in space, poly- 



32 



B BEN ALT COLLEGE BULLETIN 



hedrons, cylinders, cones, and the sphere. The course must in- 
clude the theorems, and exercises given in the standard texts. 
(Yt unit.) 

Plane Trigonometry, including the elementary motions, logari- 
thms, functions of obtuse angles, solution of right-angle triangle, 
and some work in oblique triangles. (J4 unit.) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(Two units prescribed; six units accepted.) 

LATIN 

(Three units minimum if offered; four units maximum.) 

Elementary Latin. The student should acquire during this 
year a working vocabulary of several hundred words, a complete 
mastery of ordinary forms, the simpler principles of Latin syntax, 
and correct habits of translation and composition. (1 unit.) 

Caesar. Any four books of the Gallic War, with study of the 
grammar and prose composition based upon the text read. Equiv- 
alent reading in other standard authors allowed. (1 unit.) 

Cicero. Six orations ; the four against Catiline, for Archias, 
for the Manilian Law. Prose composition based upon the text 
read, with the completion of Latin Grammar. (1 unit.) 

Virgil. Six Books of the Aeneid. These may be offered instead 
of the unit in Cicero, or the unit may be divided between the two 
authors. (1 unit.) 

GREEK 

Elementary Greek. Elementary grammar with special atten- 
tion to forms and practice in prose composition. (1 unit.) 

Xenophon. Four books of the Anabasis and prose composition. 
(1 unit.) 

Homer. Three books of Homer's Iliad or Odyssey and prose 
composition. (1 unit.) 



B R K NAV COLL E G K BULLETIN 



GERMAN 

Elementary German. Essentials of grammar, a fair vocabu- 
lary, training in sight reading, prose composition and correct pro- 
nunciation of German, reading of easy prose (at least 100 pages). 
(1 unit.) 

Grammar and Translation. Continuation of grammatical 
work, practice in correct speaking, translation of elementary texts 
(at least 150 pages). (1 unit.) 

Reading and Conversation. Grammar practice in conversation 
and the reading of at least 500 pages of standard German prose 
and poetry, especially Lessing, Schiller and Goethe, (l unit.) 

FRENCH 

First Year — Pronunciation, principles of grammar, reading of 
easy French. (1 unit.) 

Second Year — Continuation of Grammar, practice in conversa- 
tion, reading of at least 200 pages. (1 unit.) 

SPANISH 

Training in the elements of grammar and acquisition of vocabu- 
lary by practical examples and exercises, reading of easy Spanish 
prose. Great stress is laid on correct, clear and elegant Castilian 
pronunciation. (2 units.) 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

(Elective; three units accepted.) 

Physiology. A high school course based on a standard text 
such as Martin's Human Body. (J^ unit.) 

One unit will be given for a course done in a school where 
Physiology was preceded by a course in General Biology and 
where laboratory work was done and results recorded in a note- 
book, which the student will be required to submit to the Committee 
on Classification. 

34 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Physical Geography. The equivalent of work as presented in 
recent texts, with about forty laboratory lessons, (1 unit). One- 
half unit given where laboratory work is less extensive than is 
required for full unit. 

Physics. Study of a recent standard text-book with about forty 
experiments by the teacher and pupils, with laboratory manual. 
Emphasis should be laid on the quality and not the amount of 
laboratory work. (1 unit.) 

Botany. The course should be based on one of the modern 
high school text-books. Special emphasis should be laid on the 
laboratory work, which should consist of work in both the structure 
and physiology of plants. (1 unit.) 

One-half unit where laboratory work is less extensive than is 
required for full unit. 

Chemistry. Study of a recent text-book, with laboratory man- 
ual. Laboratory work is an essential part of the admission re- 
quirement. (1 unit.) 

Agriculture. The equivalent of the course in L. H. Bailey's 
"Principles of Agriculture ,, with suggested experiments. (1 
unit.) 

Biology. A study of a recent text containing the essentials of 
Botany, Zoology, Human Physiology, or a half year's course in 
either Botany or Zoology, and a half years course in Human 
Physiology. (1 unit.) 

Zoology — based on a standard text and with laboratory work 
and note book (I unit.) 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

(Elective; one or two units accepted.) 

1. Elementary Domestic Science including principles involved 
in making and care of fire, effect of heat and its application to 
different foods, selection of utensils and apparatus, selection of 
and proper care of foods; sanitation of the kitchen, table-setting, 

35 



13 R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and service; scientific study and practical preparation of beverages, 
fruits, vegetables, cereals, milk and cheese, meats, gelatins, fats, 
legumes, batters and doughs, salads and frozen dishes; prepara- 
tion of simple home meals with reference to cost and nutrition. 
(1 unit.) 

2. Elementary Domestic Art, including a study of textiles and 
of the principles and processes involved in the care and use of 
machines, threading, treading, oiling, drafting, cutting, fitting, 
stitching, designing, decorating, tucking, hemstitching, ruffling, 
joining, use of patterns, etc. (1 unit.) 

DRAWING 

(Elective; one unit accepted.) 

Freehand Drawing. Applicants offering freehand drawing for 
entrance must show ability to draw from usual plaster casts of 
ornaments or from the object; to use water colors in simple form; 
and must submit examples of elementary design and working draw- 
ings. (1 unit.) 

HISTORY 

(One unit prescribed; four units accepted.) 

One of the four subjects, preferably (a), is required for en- 
trance. 

(a) Ancient History, based on a year's study of a standard 
text covering Oriental, Greek and Roman History. (1 unit.) 

(b) Mediaeval and Modern History — a year's study of the 
history of the European nations and their development and insti- 
tutions from the period of the Germanic invasions to the close 
of the nineteenth century. Some standard text-book should be 
used and note-book kept. (1 unit.) 

(c) English History — a thorough study of English political, 
governmental and social development extending throughout a full 
year and based on a standard text. (1 unit.) 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

(d) American History or American History and Government 
— a year's advanced work in American History or in American 
History and Government, based on standard texts such as Adams 
and Trent, Hart's Essentials. Ashley. McLaughlin's American 
Nation, etc. (1 unit.) 

MUSIC 

(One to three units for admission to the Conservatory of Music.) 

1. Musical Technique and Interpretation. Ability to perform 
with satisfactory technique and intelligent interpretation, one or 
more numbers in one of the following sections: 

(1) Pianoforte: Bach "Well Tempered Clairchord", Prelude 
or Fugue; two and three part Inventions; Mozart or Beethoven, 
a sonata; Chopin, study, nocturne or prelude of moderate diffi- 
culty. 

(2) Violin: Bach, Handel, Mozart or Beethoven, a sonata; 
Rode, Fiorillo, a study of moderate difficulty; Violto, Spohr, a con- 
certo. 

(3) Voice (well placed and trained) : Bach, Mozart, Schubert, 
Schumann, Brahms, Franz, Wagner, songs ; or an aria by an old 
Italian Master. 

(For performance in one division, One Unit.) 

2. Sight-Singing and Dictation. (3 units.) 

(1) Ability to read at sight, in good rhythm, a given simple 
melody in any commonly used key (major or minor) containing 
occasional notes out of the scale, but no very remote modulations, 
i. e., not beyond dominant or subdominant or relative major or 
minor. 

(2) Ability to write in musical notation (G and F clefs) mark- 
ing proper meter (2, 3, or 4) any simple melody when played 
or sung at dictation. Familiarity with the three primary triads 
is useful but not required, (l unit.) 

37 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

3. Musical Notation and Elements of Harmony. Practice 
in legible note-writing by imitation of printed page ("White" notes 
larger; black notes smaller). G and F clefs. Metrical signs, sig- 
natures, and position of accidentals. Division into measures. 
Harmonic series. Intervals. Erection (major) of the three pri- 
mary triads. Root positions and doubling in major. Formation 
of scales. Relations of scale constituents to root and their ten- 
dencies. Consonance and dissonance. Chord connection in four 
parts. Harmonizing of melodies. Elements of melodic construc- 
tion; cadence; phrase and double phrase. Minor mode. Second- 
ary triads (II, VI, III) and their use. Dominant seventh and 
its use. Other sevenths within the key. Suspension and retarda- 
tion. Modulation (simple). Anticipation and embellishment. Some 
proficiency in 2 should precede the study of Harmony. (1 unit.) 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students bringing proper certificates of work and standing 
from the registrars of approved colleges will be admitted without 
examination, provided they enter not later than the beginning of 
the Senior year. In determining their position in the college, 
however, the value of the work done at such college, as well as 
the work offered for entrance to that college, will be measured 
by the standards of Brenau. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Young women of sufficient maturity, who are unable to meet 
the scholastic requirements for entrance to the college, are per- 
mitted to register as Special Students in courses for which they 
show sufficient preparation. Credit toward degrees will not be 
given in such cases until the student shall have satisfied the 
requirements for entrance. 

IRREGULAR STUDENTS 

Young women are admitted as Irregular Students, who have 
met the requirements for entrance, but do not wish to become 
candidates for a degree. 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE. 

The College Unit. The unit upon which all credit for col- 
lege work is based is one hour's attendance upon class exercises, 
or two hours' laboratory work, a week for one term or half 
year and the passing of all required examinations. This is desig- 
nated a "semester-hour". The student is expected to earn fif- 
teen semester-hours a term (thirty per year). At the discre- 
tion of the faculty she may be permitted to carry as much as 
twenty hours of class work a week and thus earn twenty semes- 
ter hours a term. In no case will more credit than twenty 
semester-hours a term be granted any student. Students who 
have been matriculated in Brenau Conservatory or in the Brenau 
School of Oratory and have met the entrance requirements of the 
College are permitted by the faculty of The College to take col- 
lege courses to an amount sufficient, when added to their work in 
the department in which their major work lies, to conform to the 
above regulations. No student, except special students, will be 
permitted to carry less than twelve hours a week, and they only 
for reasons satisfactory to the faculty. 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree. One hundred and twenty 
semester-hours are required for the A.B. degree under the con- 
ditions set forth below: 

(1) Freshman and Sophomore Requirements. The student 
must earn during her Freshman and Sophomore years the following 
credits in semester-hours: 

(a) Six in English; (b) six in the foreign language offered for 
entrance; (c) six in a second foreign language; (d) six in His- 
tory; (c) eight in Mathematics, or six in Logic and Elementary 
Psychology; (f) six in one Physical Science; (g) six in one Biolo- 
gical Science or in Household Economics. Total forty-two or 
forty-four semester-hours. (h) Elective courses open to Fresh- 
men and Sophomore, sufficient in amount, when added to the above 
to make sixty units. 

(2) Junior and Senior Requirements. At the beginning of 
her Junior year the student must file with the Dean a written state- 
ment of her choice of a major subject of study and a minor sub- 

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BRENAU COLLEGE B (J L L E T I N 

ject of study, which statement shall have received the approval 
of the heads of the departments concerned. In the major subject 
of study she must earn, during her college course, not less than 
twenty-four units of credit and not more than thirty-six units; 
in the minor subject of study she must earn, during her college 
course, not less than twelve units of credit and not more than 
twenty-four units. Whatever balance may be necessary that the 
total credits of Junior and Senior years may amount to sixty units, 
may be earned from elective courses open to Juniors and Seniors. 
The following are the departments in which the student may 
elect to pursue either her major or her minor subject of study: 
English Language and Literature, Ancient Languages (Latin and 
Greek), Modern Languages (French, German, Spanish, Italian) ; 
Mathematics; Philosophy and Education; History, and Political 
Science, the Physical Sciences, the Biological Sciences, Household 
Economics. She may choose her minor subject but not her major 
subject in one of the following departments: Theory and History 
of Music, Theory, History and Practice of Art, Public Speaking. 

The Title of Associate in Arts. Upon the completion of 
the Freshman and Sophomore requirements at the end of two years 
of college work the student may receive the title of Associate in 
Arts. 

Applicants for Graduation. On or before October 15th of 
the Senior year applicants for graduation are required to file with 
the Dean a formal statement of the credits already earned and a 
plan for the work of the Senior year. 



40 



Courses of Instruction 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

(Professor J. H. Simmons, Professor E. F. Pearce, 
Professor Overton, Miss Lumpkin.) 

A3. Special Problems in Rhetoric. This course is in- 
tended to show the application of rhetoric principles to the 
different kinds of material used in the literary types — Nar- 
ration, Description, Exposition and Argument. A hand-book 
will be used, but this will be supplemented by lectures and 
parellel readings. Practical exercises will be required. In 
the second term, special study will be given to Unity, Coherence 
and Emphasis, as applied to sentences and paragraphs. 

(Required of all students in Freshman or Sophomore year and 
pre-requisite to all other courses in English Language and Litera- 
ture.) 

Professor Pearce. 

B3. American Literature. This course aims to give a gen- 
eral survey of American Literature, an accurate knowledge of the 
best portion of it, and a just estimate of its total value in the world 
of letters. After a brief introductory account of early con- 
ditions in America, the class will take up in turn the literature 
of New England, of the Middle States, and of the country at large 
since the Civil War, especially the South and West. Stress will 
be laid in the class room on a few representative writers. Much 
outside reading is required, together with reports on assigned top- 
ics. Open to all students who have had English A3. Three hours 
a week throughout the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

C3. English Literature. The course covers the history of 
English Literature from Chaucer to Tennyson. It is designed as 
a general course for students who do not intend to pursue the 
subject further, and also as a preparation for more advanced 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

study. The student is brought into actual contact with the best 
writings, and is given each week some special studies on which 
she is to report. A large amount of parallel reading is required. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week throughout 
the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

D3. Anglo-Saxon. The course will embrace Old English 
grammar, reading from West Saxon prose texts, and a brief his- 
tory of the literature. Three hours a week, first term. Credit: 
three semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

E3. Development of the English Tongue. This course 
makes a survey of the various processes through which the Eng- 
lish language has acquired its present form. Three hours a week, 
second term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

Note Courses D3 and E3 must be pursued in the order 

stated, and both are required for graduation in the case of those 
students who select English as their major subject. 

Professor Simmons. 

F2. Studies in Shakespeare. Typical plays of Shakespeare 
will be read, and lectures will be given on the Poet's life, art and 
characters. Papers from students will be required in connection 
with the work. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit: four semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

G2. Studies in Wordsworth. Lectures and interpretation of 
selected poems. Open to advanced students. Two hours a week, 
second term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

Note. — This course will not be given in all years, and it will 
be provided for only after consultation between teacher and ap- 
plicants. 

Professor Simmons. 

H2. Tennyson and Browning. Representative poems are 
studied in detail, and others are read as parallel work. The course 

42 



BRE N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

is designed for advanced students and is given annually. Two 
hours a week, second term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

1 2. Chaucer. Readings from the Canterbury Tales, and lect- 
ures on the life and times of Chaucer. Open to students who have 
had course D 3. Two hours a week, second term. Credit: two 
semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

J2. Poetics. A study of the nature, origin, and kinds of poetry, 
and of the principles of versification. Open to all students who 
have had English A3. Two hours a week, first term. Credit: two 
semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

K2. The Short Story. This course is open only to those stu- 
dents who have had advanced composition work. The Philosophy of 
the Short Story ; a study of representative types ; exercises in 
writing short stories. Two hours a week throughout the year. 
Credit: four semester-hours. 

Professor Pearce. 

L2. Studies in the Development of the English Drama. 
This course deals with the rise of comedy and tragedy and surveys 
the work of the predecessors and contemporaries of Shakespeare, 
as related to his development. Open to those who have had a 
course in Shakespeare. Two hours a week throughout the year. 
Credit: four semester-hours. 

Professor Pearce. 

M2. Dramatists of the Present; A Study of the Modern 
Drama. Open to students who have had one course in Shakes- 
peare, Hauptmann, Sudermann. Rostand, Phillips, Shaw, Maeter- 
linck, Ibsen and others. Two hours a week throughout the year. 
Credit: four semester-hours. 

Professor Overton. 
Nl. Browning and the Dramatic Monolog. Open to all 
students who have had C3. One hour a week throughout the year. 
Credit: two semester-hours. 

Professor Overton. 
43 



BREN All COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Ol. Argumentation and Debate. Principles of Argumen- 
tation. Practical application in Outline of Debates. Practice 
work — forensic delivery in class and in Assembly. Six appear- 
ances in Assembly are required before graduation. Two appearances 
during the period of pursuing the course will complete the re- 
quirement for class credit. One hour a week during first term. 
Credit: one semester-hour. 

Professor Overton. 

P2. Literary Interpretation. Analysis of selections from liter- 
ature from a psychological standpoint. Study of the Central Idea in 
its obvious purpose from the author's standpoint. Analysis into Main 
and sub parts to determine relative service values of the parts to 
the whole and to each other. Written work. Two hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit: Four semester-hours. 

Professor Overton. 

Q2. Oratory and Orators. Critical study of famous orations. 
Lives and times of great orators. One hour a week during second 
term. Credit: one semester-hour. 

Professor Overton. 

latin 

Professor Merritt. 

A3. Horace. — Odes and Epodes. A few selections also from 
the Satires and Epistles. Metres, style and contemporary history. 
Three hours a week, first term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

B3. Livy — Books One and Two. Prepared and sight exer- 
cises in Latin composition. Livy's style and his qualities as an 
historian. Subjects connected with Livy's history — Early Roman 
institutions. Second term, three hours a week. Credit: three 
semester-hours. 

C3. Cicero's de Senectute et de Amicita. Syntax studied 
formally and exercises given in translating English into Latin, 
illustrating usages ; Cicero's philosophy, his views concerning old 
age and friendship compared with those of modern writers. Three 
hours a week, first term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

44 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

D3. Plautus and Terence — Selected Plays. The origin and 
development of Roman Comedy. Three hours a week, second 
term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

E3. Juvenal. Roman private life at the close of the first cen- 
tury. Juvenal's style as a writer compared with that of Tacitus. 
Three hours a week, first term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

F3. Tacitus — Agricola and Germania. The Roman Provin- 
cial System and Conquest of Britain. The Early Empire. Three 
hours a week, second term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

G2. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura; Cicero, De Natura Deorum; 
Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, Roman Society and 
Literature as reflected in the poetry of Catullus. Study of Roman 
Elegy. Two hours a week, first term. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

Hi. Roman Mythology. A comprehensive study based upon 
a standard text. One hour a week throughout the year. Credit: two 
semester-hours . 

12. Origin and Development of Roman Satire. Selections 
from Ennius, Lucilius, Horace, Petronius, Persius, Juvenal. Two 
hours a week, second term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

GREEK 

Professor Merritt. 

A3. First Lessons in Greek. White's text is used as guide. 
Goodwin's Grammar. Three hours a week, first term. Credit: 
three semester-hours. 

B3. Xenophon's Anabasis. Collateral study of the grammar 
and prose composition. Three hours per week, second term. Cred- 
it: three semester-hours. 

C3. Homer's Iliad. Three hours a week, throughout the year. 
Credit: six semester-hours. 

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BREN AU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

GERMAN 

Professor Williams. 

A3. Elementary German. This course embraces: 1. Training 
in the elements of grammar and acquisition of a vocabulary by 
practical examples and exercises. 2. Reading of easy German 
prose as soon as the student is ready for it. 3. Correct pronun- 
ciation. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit: six 
semester-hours. 

B3. Intermediate German. A more critical study of grammar, 
mastery of syntax, and idioms, mainly in connection with reading 
matter, German prose composition, "Minna von Barnhelm," by 
Lessing. "Wilhelm Tell/' by Schiller. Three hours a 1 week, 
throughout the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

C3. Classical and Modern German Literature. Reading of 
the more difficult works of classical and modern writers. Exercises 
in original composition, letter writing and essays. German prose 
composition. Readings: Selections from Schiller, Goethe, Lessing 
and SchefFel. Three hours a week, throughout the year. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 

D2. Advanced Composition and Conversation. Conversa- 
tion, essays, letter writing and free composition. Eighteenth and 
Nineteenth Century Literature of Germany. This course to be 
given by lectures, which must be written in German. The language 
of the classroom is German. Two hours a week, throughout the 
year. Credit: four semester-hours. 



46 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Romance Languages 

Professor Jacobini. 



FRENCH 



A3. Elementary French. This course embraces: (1) Train- 
ing in the elements of grammar, and acquisition of a good vocabu- 
lary; (2) Reading of easy French prose in second term. 
Squaire P'rench Grammar, Part I ; Talbot's "Le Francais et sa 
Patrie"; Haley's "Un Mariage d'Amour"; Malot's "Sans Famine". 
Three hours a week during both terms. Credit: six semester-hours. 

B3. Intermediate French. A more critical study of grammar; 
mastery of syntax and idioms, mainly in connection with the read- 
ing matter. Fraser and Squaire. Part II. Francois's Introductory 
French Composition ; Labiche's "LeVoyage de Monsieur Perri- 
chon"; "Atala" by Chateaubriand; "Graziella" by Lamartine. 
Three hours a week during both terms. Credit: six semester-hours. 

C3. Advanced Course. Reading the more difficult works of 
classical and modern writers. Exercise in free composition, essay 
and letter writing. Francois's "Advanced French Prose Compo- 
sition", "Anthology of French Prose and Poetry" — Freeland and 
Michaud. Three hours a week during both terms. Credit: six 
semester-hours. 

D2. Advanced Grammar, Composition and Conversation. 
Conversation, letter writing, essays and free composition on lec- 
tures from modern writers. The language of the class room is 
French. Two hours a week during both terms. Credit: four 
semester-hours. 

SPANISH 

A3. Elementary Course. This course embraces: (1) Train- 
ing in the elements of grammar and acquisition of vocabulary by 
practical examples and exercises. (2) Reading of easy Spanish 
prose as soon as student is prepared to take delight in it. (3) 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Constant practice in conversation with a view to making the 
student think in Spanish. Great stress is laid on correct, 
clear and elegant pronunciation in all exercises. "All Spanish 
Method'' by Hall, First Book; "El Pajaro Verde" by Valera. 
Three hours per week during both terms. Credit: six semester- 
hours. 

B2. Advanced Course. A more critical study of grammar, 
mastery of syntax and idioms, mostly in connection with the 
reading matter. "All Spanish Method" by Hall, Second Bookf 
Alarcon's El Capitan Veneno; Echegary's O Locura o'Santidad; 
Galdo's Mariannella; Calderon's La Vida es Sueno. Spanish Prose 
Composition by Crawford. Two hours a week during both terms. 
Credit: four semester-hours. 

ITALIAN 

A3. Elementary Italian. Grammar, composition, elemen- 
tary readings and the acquisition of a vocabulary. This is a re- 
quired course for students of Voice in the Conservatory, and is 
open also to college students. Three hours a week during both 
terms. Credit: Six semester-hours. 

B2. Advanced Course. The aim of this course is to enable the 
student to understand written Italian, and includes practice in 
composition and translation. De Amici's II Cuore; Goldoni's La- 
Locandiera; Manzoni's I promessi sposi. Two hours a week dur- 
ing both terms. Credit: four semester-hours. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Professor Binglev. 

A3. Freshman Mathematics. The work of this year consists 
of the following: 

a. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

b. Graphic Algebra, including a study of co-ordinates, the 
plotting of curves, and the derivation of the equations of the 
straight line and the circle. 

48 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit: six semester- 
hours. 

B3. Analysis. Includes the study of equations of the conies 
and an introduction to the Calculus. Three hours a week, first 
term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

C3. Advanced Algebra, including a study of complex num- 
bers, determinants, theory of equations, partial fractions, series, 
and logauthms. Three hours a week, second term. Credit: three 
semester-hours. 

D3. Differential and Integral Calculus. Three hours a 
week throughout the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

E3. Differential Equations. This is. a course of an ele- 
mentary character in ordinary differential equations. Three hours 
a week, first term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

F3. History of Mathematics. Three hours a week, second 
term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

Gl. Teaching of Mathematics. A course dealing with the 
problems involved in teaching mathematics in the elementary and 
secondary school. One hour a week throughout the year. Credit: 
two semester-hours. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Professor Riley, Miss Harris. 

A3. European History. An introductory course, covering the 
historical development of Europe from the ninth to the nineteenth 
century. It includes a study of the principal institutions of the 
Middle Ages, and of the Renaissance, the Reformation and the 
Wars of Religion, and the rise of the modern nations. Special 
attention is given to the methods and materials of history. Text- 
books, readings, discussions, and informal lectures. 

Required of all regular students in Freshman or Sophomore 
year, and prerequisite to all other courses in history and political 
science. 

49 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit: six semester- 
hours. 

B3. English History. A general course dealing with the po- 
litical, economic and social development of the English people 
from the earliest time to the present. Text-book, readings, dis- 
cussions and lectures. Open to students who have had course A3 
or an equivalent. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit : 
six semester-hours. 

C3. American History to 1829- This course covers the colo- 
nial and revolutionary periods, the confederation and the formation 
and testing of the Union. It is based upon the study of text- 
books and a large amount of required reading from standard au- 
thorities. Three hours a week throughout the year. For Juniors 
and Seniors. Credit: six semester-hours. (Not to be given in 
1916-1917.) 

D3. American History Since 1829. A course covering the po-: 
litical, social and economic development of the United States since 
the rise of the National Democracy under Andrew Jackson. 
About one-half of the year's study is devoted to American develop- 
ment since 1865. Text-books, required readings from standard 
authorities, lectures and reports. Three hours a week during the 
year. For Juniors and Seniors. Credit: six semester-hours. 
(Courses C3 and D3 are given in alternate years. Course D3 is 
to be given in 1916-1917.) 

E2. Europe Since the Congress of Vienna. A course intend- 
ed to serve as an introduction to the study of current political, 
economic and social problems. The text book is Hazen's "Europe 
Since 1915", and extensive collateral readings are required. Open to 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week, first term. Credit: 
three semester-hours. 

F3. Economics. An introductory course intended to give students 
a broad grasp of the fundamental principles of economic science 
Text-book, required readings, and reports. Open to students who 
have had course A3 or an equivalent. Three hours a week, through- 
out the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

G3. American Government. A study of the organization and 
activities of the American government, local, state, and national. 
Open to students who have had course A3. Three hours a week, 
second term. Credit: three semester hours. 

H3. Political Science. This is an introductory course, con- 
sisting of the study of the nature, origin, functions, and forms of the 
State. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week, first 
term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY. 

Professor H. J. Pearce. 

A3. Logic Three hours a week, second term. Hills "Jevon's 
Elements of Logic, " Credit: three semester-hours. 

B3. General Psychology. Three hours a week, first term. 
Text-book and class discussions. Credit: three semester-hours. 

C2. Experimental Psychology. Four laboratory hours a 
week, second term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

D2. The History of Philosophy, (a) Ancient and Mediae- 
val Philosophy. Two hours a week, first term. 

(b) Modern Philosophy, beginning with Des Cartes. Two 
hours a week, second term. Rogers History of Philosophy is 
used as text. Windelband and Uerberweg as reference books. 
Credit: four semester-hours. 

El. Popular Psychology. A lecture course devoted to the 
discussion of the popular fads to which the term psychology is 
properly applied, embracing Hypnotism, Mesmerism, Telepathy, 
Spiritism. A historical review of these and the various cults 
which have grown out of them will be given, and the truth and 
error concerning each as viewed by orthodox science will be 
pointed out. One hour a week, second term. Open to Juniors 
and Seniors. Credit: one semester-hour. 

51 



H R E A T AV CO L L E (J E B V L L E T J N 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professors Murfee, Schiffer and Mr. T. J. Pearce. 

A3. General Inorganic Chemistry, involving the elements, com- 
pounds and laws, the Periodic Law being emphasized. Besides 
the usual matter of this class, some organic compounds are intro- 
duced in their appropriate places to show their relations and to 
serve as practical use to students of domestic science. Qualitative 
analysis is introduced. The course is conducted largely by lec- 
tures and laboratory experiments. Text and reference books: 
Remsen's Inorganic Chemistry; Williams' Essentials of Chemistry; 
Kahlenberg's Outlines of Chemistry. Two hours recitation and 
two hours laboratory a week throughout the year. Credit: six sem- 
ester-hours. 

B3. Organic Chemistry and Analysis. The course embraces 
the principles of Chemical Philosophy, and the Carbon Compounds 
will be studied and Qualitative Analysis continued. Quantitative 
Analysis here receives attention. Text-books: Remsen's Organic 
Chemistry, Noyes' Qualitative Analysis, Cowes' and Coleman's 
Quantitative Analysis. Three hours a week, throughout the year. 
Credit: six semester-hours. 

C3. Industrial Chemistry. This work consists of Chemistry 
applied to various industrial arts, to sanitary and commercial 
values, and to the household. Text-books: Thorp's Industrial 
Chemistry, Blythe's Food Analysis. The equivalent of three hours 
a week, throughout the jea,r. Credit : six semester-hours. 

*D3. Household Chemistry. Open to students who have had 
chemistry A3 or an equivalent. The course embraces a study of 
the application of chemistry to the problems of the Modern House- 
hold, e. g., air, water detergents, gas, petroleum products and food 
materials, bacteria and micro-organisms.. One recitation and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week throughout the year. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 

Professor Schiffer. 

^Described also as a course in Household Economics. 

52 



BRE XAU COLLEGE B UL L E T I X 



PHYSICS 

Professor Murfee. 

A3. General Physics. A course covering the principles of 
mechanics, heat, light, sound, magnetism, electricity and radio 
energy, is offered. Experiments before the class and individual 
work in the laboratory are required of each student. Carhart's 
College Physics. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory 
work, throughout the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Bl. Acoustics. This course is designed for Music and Oratory 
pupils who have not had Course A. One hour a week during 
second term. Credit: one semester-hour. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Murfee. 

A3. General Geology. All the departments of this science, 
dynamical, structural, and historical, are studied carefully and 
applications of these principles made to the understanding of the 
fossils found in the rocks of the various ages of the world. 

An annual excursion is made to the great mining regions around 
Dahlonega and to the wonderful Tallulah gorge, affording fine op- 
portunities for studying mineral veins, ore deposits, stratifications, 
faults, etc. Tarr's Geology; Geike's Geology; LeConte. Three 
hours a week during first term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Murfee. 

A3. General Astronomy. This department is in possession 
of a really valuable and serviceable telescope, magnifying some 
four hundred diameters, and provided with all necessary attach- 
ments for reading altitudes, declinations, etc. The observatory 
recently constructed on the roof of the auditorium facilitates the 

53 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

practical work in astronomy and stimulates much interest in the 
study. 

The course in Astronomy embraces the solution of such problems 
as are usually connected with such a course. Todd's text on 
Astronomy is used. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours 
a week, during second term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

BIOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Wharfield. 

A3. General Biology. This course is intended for those stu- 
dents who have had no previous training in the subject. It con- 
sists largely of laboratory work with the aid of the compound 
microscope. The pupil will be given a clear insight into such 
life processes as can be determined from the study of the lower 
orders of plants and invertebrate animals. Such forms as the pro- 
cocus, yeast plant, fungi, ferns, the protozoa, fresh-water hydra, 
starfish, crayfish, locust and frog will be studied. The work 
will be supplemented with lectures on the use of the compound 
microscope and re-agents and on the collection and preparation 
of material for examination. Text and laboratory guides: Didge's 
Elementary Practical Biology, Sedgewick and Wilson's General 
Biology. Open to all classes. Four hours of laboratory work and 
one lecture a week throughout the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

B3. Zoology. This course is intended to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the form, life and habits of the common animals of 
the field and forest. The time will be divided between text-book 
work and examination of animals in the laboratory. The external 
anatom}^ of the forms will be studied and compared, but very lit- 
tle dissection will be undertaken. The work will be supplemented 
with lectures on the habits of the animals studied, and with ex- 
cursions to the woods and fields to study them in their natural 
habitats. Three hours per week during first term. Credit: six 
semester-hours. 

C3. Botany. The course embraces the essentials of Cytology — 
giving special emphasis to the cell as a unit of life. Plant Physi- 
ology, Phytopathology > Ecology, Bacteriology, Economic Botany. 

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BEEN A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Microscopic slides are prepared by the class. Three hours a week 
during second term. Credit: six semester-hours. 

D2. Advanced Physiology. This course is based upon the 
study of the nervous system. It is intended primarily for students 
taking a course in Psychology, but is open to all advanced stu- 
dents. Much attention will be given to the anatomy of the brain 
and spinal cord. The work is intended to train the student in 
original investigation, and in the use of physiological apparatus. 
The function of the nervous system, as well as the structure, is 
to be emphasized. This course is largely laboratory. Five hours 
laboratory work, or its equivalent in class-room, a week during first 
term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

Professor T. J. Simmons. 

A2. The Old Testament history and prophetic writings. Two 
hours a week during first term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

B2. The New Testament with special reference to the Life 
of Christ and the Acts of the Apostles. Two hours a week dur- 
ing second term. Credit: two semester-hours. 

C3. A course in Ethics based on Janets Elements of Morals. 
First term, three hours a week. Credit: three semester-hours. 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS. 

Professor Schiffer. 

A3. Theory and Practice of Cookery. Instruction in the 
composition and dietetic value of food materials. A syllabus is 
used and lessons are arranged in logical order, each food princi- 
ples being illustrated by the preparation of simple dishes. The 
object of this course is to teach general principles with their appli- 
cation in cooking of all kinds of food. The course is taught by 
both individual and group methods. Four hours a week laboratory 
and one hour recitation throughout the year. Credit: six semester- 
hours. 

55 



BREN AU COLLEGE BULLET! N 

B2. Development and Advanced Work in Foods. Instruc- 
tion and practice of an advanced character in the preparation of 
more complicated dishes than are included in first course. Taught 
by individual and group methods, including individual class demon- 
stration, and the preparation and serving of properly balanced 
menus. Two terms, two hours laboratory and one hour of recita- 
tion a week. Credit: four semester-hours. 

Cl. Table Service. This course includes the care of the din- 
ing room and pantry, care of silver and cutlery; care of lamps, 
serving breakfast, luncheon, dinner and afternoon tea. One hour 
a week during first term. Credit: one semester-hour. 

D2. Home Sanitation. House location, character of soil, 
ground water and its influence on health, ground airs, drains, 
cellar walls, and care of cellar. Water supply of villages, wells, 
cisterns, springs, sources of infection, construction of wells and 
cisterns for filtration and storage of water, water supply to cities, 
surface of river water, source of infection, methods of purifica- 
tion. 

Plumbing Appliances. (1) For the introduction of water; (2) 
for the removal of sewage. 

Ventilation. Atmosphere vitiation due to breathing, to gases 
from the soil, furnaces, etc. Methods of ventilation. The disin- 
fection of houses during and after contagious diseases. 

The Home. Evolution of the house, house-planning, construc- 
tion, decorations, furnishings, care of the house floors, walls, 
furniture, and other subjects relating to the home. Taught by 
use of text-books and lectures. One hour a week throughout the 
year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

El. Dietetics. This course includes the principles of nutri- 
tion, and the methods of determining the food requirements of 
normal individuals from infancy to old age. The students are 
shown how to calculate the 100 calorie portions of food, and the 
common foods are weighed, measured and prepared on this basis. 
Dietaries are made out by the students for individuals and groups 

56 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLET1X 

with varying requirements and incomes. One hour a week through- 
out the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

F3. Household Chemistry. Prerequisites: One year in the 
College Chemistry. This course embraces a study of Household 
Chemistry which treats of the principles of the science in the 
household and daily life, e. g., air, water, detergents, gas, petroleum 
products and food materials and with a study of bacteria and micro- 
organisms. Two terms, one hour recitation and two laboratory 
periods. Credit: three semester-hours. 

G3. Elementary Sewing. First Course. Practice in the va- 
rious stitches is illustrated in the making of models on materials 
varying from the coarser to the finer textures, basting, running 
stitch, combination stitch, back stitch, half back stitch, weaving, 
hemming, hem-stitching, over-handing, gathering fend striking, 
placing and putting on of bands, putting in plackets, preparation 
and making of button holes, fancy stitching, chain and feather 
stitching, illustration of square and mitered corners, mending, 
patching, darning. Three hours a week throughout the year. 
Credit: three semester-hours. 

H3. Advanced Sewing. Talks on materials, manufacture from 
staple articles, cotton, flax, wool and silk. Talks on color and color 
combinations in materials, purchase of materials, planning, cutting 
and making up of simple garments. Three hours a week through- 
out the year. Credit: three semester-hours. 

12. Bacteriology. A course designed especially for students 
of domestic science, and intended to include a careful study of all 
the common bacteria involved in the study of foods and a general 
study of the principles of fermentation. This course is also open 
to regular Juniors who elect Science either as a major or minor 
subject. Two hours a week for two terms. Credit: four semester- 
hours. 



57 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

THEORY AND HISTORY OF ART. 

Professor Weygandt. 

Al. Principles of Criticism. A course, elementary in charac- 
ter, designed to lead the student to an intelligent appreciation of 
the beauty and meaning of works of art. Copies of the most world- 
renowned works of art will be studied and criticised from the 
artistic standpoint. Written criticisms are required at stated in- 
tervals of those members of the class who desire credit for the 
course. Two terms, one hour a week. (Two units.) 

Bl. History of Art. Introductory Course. This course com- 
prises a general outline of the history of graphic art, and bio- 
graphical study of the great masters. Text-books, readings, re- 
citations. One hour a week, both terms. (2 units.) 

Cl. History of Architecture. Advanced course for Juniors 
and Seniors, including a detailed study of the leading styles of 
architecture, with selected types for illustrative purposes. Text- 
books, recitations, readings. One hour a week, both terms. (2 
units.) 

Cl. History of Painting. Advanced course for Juniors and 
Seniors. This is a course in the history of modern painting from 
the Renaissance to the present time. Text-books, readings, re- 
citations. One hour a week, both terms. (2 units.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors T. J. Simmons, E. F. Pearce, Merritt, Murfee, 
Williams, Schiffer, Overton, Riley. 

*A3. Educational Psychology. The course will embrace a 
thorough study of the Instincts and other factors in human develop- 
ment. Texts: Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child Study, Hall's 
Youth. Three hours a week, second term. Credit: three semester- 
hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

58 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

*B3. History of Education. The time will be occupied in 
studying the different forms of educational thought from the earli- 
est times up to the mediaeval and modern transitions. Special 
study will be given to Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbert, 
Spencer and Mann. (6 units.) Text: Seely's History of Edu- 
cation; Dewey's The School and Society. Three times a week, 
first term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

*C3. Principles and Practice of Teaching. 

(a) Fundamental Principles of Education. 

(b) Methods, The recitation, School Management. 

The class will meet three times a week throughout the entire 
session. Texts: Colgrove's The Teacher and the School, Mc- 
Murray's How to Study and Teaching How to Study, Gear's Man- 
ual of Methods for Georgia Teachers. Hollisters High School 
Administration. Three times a week throughout the year. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 

Professor Simmons. 

D3. Educational Sociology. 

(a) Introduction to Sociology. A study of the phenomena 
of social life designed as an introduction to theoretical and prac- 
tical sociology. Text-books, readings, lectures and discussions. 
For Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week during the first 
term. Credit: three semester-hours. 

(b) Principles of Sociology. A study of sociological theory. 
For Juniors and Seniors who have had the course described above, 
(a). Three hours a week during the second term. Credit: three 
semester-hours. 

El. Observation and Practice Teaching. Courses for ob- 
servation and practice work in the departments of study in which 
students are pursuing their major and minor subjects. Each can- 



*Graduates of Brenau College whose undergraduate work included these 
three courses in Education and two courses in "Observation and Practice 
Teaching" (Course El), receive the Professional Certificate of the Geor- 
gia State Board of Education, which entitles them to teach in any 
elementary or secondary school in the State. 

59 



BRE NAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

didate for the degree in Education is required to take the two 
courses which deal with the teaching of her major and minor sub- 
jects. 

(a) The Teaching of English. A course in which the chief 
problems of the teaching of English are discussed, with special 
reference to the needs of the high school ; content, purpose, methods, 
text-books and collateral readings, keeping of note books, systems 
of marking. Open to Juniors and Seniors whose major or minor 
subject is English. One hour per week throughout the year. Cred- 
it: two semester-hours. 

Professor Pearce. 

(b) The Teaching of Latin. This course includes a consid- 
eration of the methods of teaching high school Latin; and of the 
contents of the high school course in Latin; and of the use of 
text-books and reference books. Open only to Juniors and Seniors 
whose major or minor subject of study is Latin. One hour per 
week throughout the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

Professor Merritt. 

(c) The Teaching of Mathematics. Including a study of 
the chief problems of the teacher of Mathematics; content, pur- 
pose, methods, text, etc. Open to Juniors and Seniors whose major 
or minor subject is Mathematics. One hour a week, both terms. 
Credit: two semester-hours. 

Professor Bingley. 

(d) The Teaching of History. A course dealing with the 
principal problems of the teacher of History with special reference 
to the high school teacher; scope, purpose, methods, text-books 
and reference books and their use, note-book and map work, sys- 
tems of marking. Open to Juniors and Seniors whose major or 
minor subject is History. One hour a week throughout the year. 
Credit : two semester-hours. 

Professor Riley. 

(e) The Teaching of Natural Sciences in the High 
School. This course presents the chief problems of the teacher 
of science in the high school. Content, methods, use of books, 

60 



B $ E X A U COLLEGE BULLET1X 

etc. Open only to those whose major or minor subject is a physi- 
cal or biological science. One hour a week throughout the year. 
Credit: two semester-hours. Professor Murfee. 

(f) The Teaching of Modern Languages in the High 
School. A course dealing with the main problems of the high 
school teacher; methods, content, texts, etc. Open only to those 
whose major or minor subject is a modern language. One hour a 
week, throughout the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

Professor Williams. 

(g) The Teaching of Reading. A course in the school of 
Oratory, open to students in the college including the method and 
purpose of the course in reading. One hour a week throughout 
the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

Professor Overton. 

(h) The Teaching of Home Economics in Public Schools. 
A course dealing with the main problems of the public school 
teacher: lesson plans, methods and laboratory work, text books, 
reference books, utilitarian value of Home Economics, and the 
development of the teaching of Home Economics. Open only to 
those whose major or minor subject is Home Economics. One 
period of two hours a week throughout the year. Credit: two sem- 
ester-hours. 

Professor Schiffer. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

Miss Wharfield. 

1. Elementary Course. Marching tactics, rhythmic gymnas- 
tics, calisthentics, outdoor and indoor games. 

For all students in their first year. No credit. 

2. Hygiene. Lectures on the care of the body, in regard to ex- 
ercise, sleep, diet, etc. 

Required of all students. No credit. 

61 



BREN All COLLEGE BULLETIN 

S. Advanced Course. Marching tactics, rhythmic gymnastics, 
calisthenics, dumb-bell or wand exercises, outdoor and indoor 
games, easy folk dances. 

Required of all students who have had courses 1 and 2. No 
credit. 

4. Special Gymnastics. Athletics, gymnastics, Gilbert sys- 
tem; rhythmic movements, folk dances. An extra fee is charged for 
this course. No credit. 

THEORY AND HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

Students in the College may receive credit for courses in the 
Theory and History of Music under the regulations stated on 
page 40. For description of courses see page 72-74. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Students in the College may receive credit for work in Public 
Speaking under the regulations regarding the choice of major and 
minor subjects. (See page 40.) For outline of courses see pages 
84-92. 





SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 


HOUR 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


9:00 


Eng. A 3 (Sec. III.) 
Hist. E3 
Geology A 3 
Astronomy A 3 
Household Ec. A 3 


Eng. A3 (Sec. in.) 
Hist. E3 
Geology A 3 
Astronomy A 3 
German D 2 


Hist. A3 
French D 2 
Latin C 3 
Latin D 3 
Education A 3 
German B 3 
Household Ec. H 3 


10:00 


Spanish A 3 
Education B 3 
Math. A 3 


English F 2 
Education B 3 
Spanish A 3 
Chem. A 3 
Math. A3 
Household Ec. G 3 


Eng. C3 
Biol. D2 

French A 3 (Sec. I.) 
Latin G 2 
Latin I 2 
Education D 3 
Philos. A 3 and B 3 
Household Ec. H 3 


11:00 


Eng. D 3 and E 3 

Hist. B3 

French A 3 (Sec. II.) 

German A 3 

Latin E 3 

Latin F3 


Eng. D 3 and E 3 

Hist. B3 

French A3 (Sec. II.) 

German A 3 

Latin E 3 

Latin F3 

Household Ec. G3 


Eng. A3 (Sec. I.) 
Eng. B3 
Biol. D 2 
Hist. F3 
German C 3 
Latin A 3 and B 3 
Math. B 3 and C 3 
Chem. C 3 


12:00 


CHAPEL 


CHAPEL 


CHAPEL 


12:15 


Hist. D3 
Ch^m. B 3 
French C 3 
Math. D3 


Eng. A3 (Sec. II.) 
Hist. D3 
French C 3 
Math. D3 


Eng. J 2 and H 2 
Italian A 3 
Eng. K2 
Bible A 2 and B 2 


2:30 


Biol. B 3 and C 3 

Greek A 3 

Math. E 3 and F 3 

Bible C 3 

Chem. A3 

Household Chem. D 3 


Biol. B 3 and C 3 
Greek A 3 
French D 2 
Math. E 3 and F 3 
Philos. C 2 and D 2 
Bible C3 
Chem. B 3 
Household Ec. A 3 


Hist. G 3 and H 3 
French B 3 
Education C 3 
Physics A 3 
Biol. A3 
Household Chem. D 3 


3:30 


Chem. A 3 
Household Chem. D 3 


Biol. B 3 and C 3 
Chem. B 3 
Household Ec. A 3 


Physics A 3 

Biol. A3 

Household Chem. D 3 



63 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS-Continued 



THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


Hist. A3 
Latin C 3 
Latin D 3 
Education A 3 
German B 3 
Household Ec. C 1 


Eng. A 3 (Sec. III.) 
Hist. E3 
Geology A 3 
Astronomy A 3 
German D 2 
Household Ec. H 3 


Hist. A3 
French D 2 
Latin C 3 
Latin D 3 
Education A 3 
German B 3 
Household Ec. H 3 


Eng. C 3 

French A 3 (Sec. I.) 
Education D 3 
Philos. A 3 and B 3 
Household Ec. C 1 


English F 2 
Spanish A 3 
Education B 3 
Chem. A 3 
Math. A 3 
Household Ec. G3 


Kng. C 3 
Biol. D2 

French A 3 (Sec. I.) 
Latin G2 
Latin I 2 
Education D 3 
Philos. A 3 and B 3 
Math. Gl 
Household Ec. H 3 


Eng. A3 (Sec. I.) 
Eng. B 3 
Hist. F3 
German C 3 
Latin A 3 and B 3 
Math. B 3 and C 3 
Household Chem. D 3 


Eng. D 3 and E 3 
Hist. B 3 

French A 3 (Sec. II.) 
German A 3 
Chem. C 3 
Household Ec. G3 


Eng. A 3 (Sec. I.) 
Eng. B 3 
Hist. F 3 
German C 3 
Latin A 3 and B 3 
Math B 3 and C 3 
Household Ec. G3 




CHAPEL 


CHAPEL 


Weekly Convocation 


Eng. A3 (Sec. II.) 
Hist. D3 
Chem. B 3 
French C 3 
Math. D 3 


Eng. A3 (Sec. II.) 
Eng. J 2 and H 2 
Italian A 3 
Eng. K2 
Bible A 2 and B 2 


Hist. G 3 and n 3 
French B 3 
Education C 3 
Latin HI 
Physics A 3 
Biol. A3 
Household Ec. B 2 


Biol. B 3 and C 3 
Greek A 3 
French D 2 
Math. E 3 and F 3 
Philos. C 2 and D 2 
Bible C 3 
Chem. C 3 
Household Ec. A 3 


Hist. G 3 and H 3 
French B 3 
Education C 3 
Physics A 3 
Biol. A3 
Household Ec. B 2 


Italian A 3 
Biol. A 3 
Household Ec. B 2 


Biol. B 3 and C 3 
Chem. C 3 
Household Ec. A 3 


Household Ec. B 2 



64 



BRENAU CONSERVATORY 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Otto W. G. Pfefferkorn, 

Director of the Conservatory of Music and 

Professor of Piano. 

Benjamin F. Havens, 
Professor of Piano. 

John Townsend Sinnette, 
Professor of Piano. 

Emil Bruno Michaelis, 
Professor of Violin and Piano. 

Carrie Sue Blocker, 
Professor of Piano and Harmony. 

Mortimer Wilson, 
Professor of Organ and Theory and History of Music. 

Louis Alberti, A.M., 
Professor of Voice and Theory. 

Neal McCay, 
Professor of Voice. 

Florence M. Overton, 

Dean of the School of Oratory and 

Professor of Vocal Interpretation. 

Grace Jean Salls, 
Professor of Public Speaking. 

65 



BREN A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 



John H. Weygandt, 
Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

Mrs. M. M. Childs, 
Assistant Professor of Piano. 

Ella Parker Leonard, 
Instructor in English. 

Iona Peterman, 
Instructor in Piano* 

Ethel Wharfield, A.B v 
Instructor in Physical Training. 

Henry Stewart, 
Instructor in Piano. 

Mrs. Corinne Pearce Turnipseed, 
Instructor in Voice. 

Winnie Carter, 
Instructor in Voice. 

Mary Blanton, 
Instructor in Public Speaking. 



Instructor in German. 



Instructor in History. 

Ruby McGaughey, 
Assistant in Piano. 



*To be elected. 

66 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Brenau Conservatory was organized in 1890, and consists of 
the Conservatory of Music, the School of Oratory, and the De- 
partment of Art. It occupies Geiger Memorial Hall (Music), 
Overton Hall (Oratory), and the Art Building, each of which is 
specially adapted to the purposes of instruction and practice of 
the field of study to which it is devoted. 

The Conservatory of Music offers extensive practical and theo- 
retical courses in music, and is equipped to fit students for the 
profession as teachers, artists, theorists, or critics. It makes 
provision also for the study of music as a means of general cul- 
ture. Students of Brenau College may pursue courses of study 
in the Conservatory, for which credit towards the A. B. degree 
is given. (See page 40). The professors and instructors are ex- 
perienced teachers who have enjoyed the best advantages afforded 
by this country and Europe. The equipment is unusually com- 
plete, consisting of eighty-six pianos for teaching and practice 
purposes, and two pipe organs. Concerts and recitals are held 
in the Auditorium, which is located in the Auditorium Building, 
adjoining Geiger Memorial Hall, and has a seating capacity of 
about twelve hundred. 

The Brenau School of Oratory offers courses in Vocal Expres- 
sion, Physical Training, Debate, and Dramatic Art. The courses 
are planned with a view to fitting students for professional work 
as teachers and readers. Provision is made also for students who 
wish to pursue such courses of study for purposes of general 
culture, and students of Brenau College are permitted to take part 
of their work for the A.B. degree in the School of Oratory. (See 
page 40). The School of Oratory is housed in Overton Hall, 
in which are located ample class-rooms, studios, practice rooms, and 
the Recital Hall, which is used for dramatic purposes. The school 
owns a large number of costumes representing various countries 
and historical periods, and has a departmental library of about 
one thousand volumes. 

The Department of Art offers courses of instruction in the 
theory and history of art, and in drawing, painting, and the arts 
and crafts. The work of the Department is planned both for stu- 
dents wishing to pursue courses of study in this field with a view 

67 



BRE N A U VOL L E O E BULLETIN 



to making art their vocation and for those who may elect to study 
art as part of a liberal education. Credit is given to the latter, 
class of students in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 
the A.B. degree, in accordance with the regulations of the college. 



ADMISSION TO THE CONSERVATORY 

1. To Courses of Study Leading to Degrees (Mus.B., and B.O.) 
and to the Diploma in Art. 

The requirements for admission as a regular or special student, 
to the courses of study leading to the degrees, Bachelor of Music 
and Bachelor of Oratory, and to the course leading to a Diploma 
in Art, are the same as those for admission to Brenau College. 
(See page 40.) Applicants for admission to the degree course 
in music, may offer, however, from one to three units in theoretical 
and practical music in partial satisfaction of the requirements. 
(See page 72.) When counted for entrance these courses may 
not be again used towards the satisfaction of the requirements 
for graduation. One unit in freehand drawing may in a similar 
manner be offered by applicants for admission to the course lead- 
ing to the Diploma in Art. 

2. To Courses of Study Leading to the Diploma in Music 
and to Certificates in Music, Oratory and Art. 

Students not less than sixteen years of age may be admitted to 
the courses leading to a diploma in music and to certificates in 
music, oratory and art. Such students are not admitted to courses 
in the College unless they have met the requirements for entrance 
to the Freshman Class, but courses of instruction are provided by 
the Conservatory in such literary subjects as are required for any 
such diploma or certificate. 

3. Irregular and Unclassified Students. 

Students not less than sixteen years of age may be admitted to 
courses in practical Music (Piano, Voice, Violin, Organ) ; or Art, 
(Drawing, Painting, Arts and Crafts). Such students are re- 
quired to carry courses of study equivalent in amount to the minimum 
permitted by college regulations (twelve hours a week). They 

68 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

may not enter a class of college rank, but are allowed to take any 
of the literary courses offered by the Conservatory, for which they 
are prepared. The rule regarding the minimum amount of work 
does not apply to non-resident students living or boarding in 
Gainesville or neighboring towns. These students are enumerated 
in the catalogue as Unclassified Non-resident Students. 

ADVANCED STANDING. 

Credit is given for work done in other colleges, schools of music, 
and schools of oratory. For work done in high schools or under 
private teachers, credit will be given only after the expiration of 
a period sufficient to enable instructors to evaluate such work. 



69 



Courses of Study in the Conserva- 
tory of Music 

The following courses of study are offered by the Conservatory 
of Music: 

The course leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music. 

The course leading to the Diploma in Music. 

The course leading to the Teacher's Certificate in Music, 

Courses in Practical Music. 

Courses for Students in Brenau College counting towards the 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Course Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music. 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music, one hundred and twenty 
semester-hours of credit are required. This requirement may be 
satisfied by the completion of the following work: at least thirty 
semester-hours of literary work; at least forty-eight semester-hours 
of practical music (Piano, Voice, Violin, Organ) ; and a minimum 
of thirty semester-hours in the Theory and History of Music; the 
remaining credit up to one hundred and twenty semester-hours 
from a second department of practical music (Piano, Voice, Violin, 
Organ) additional college courses, additional courses in the Theory 
and History of Music, and additional credit in the department in 
practical music in which this major work lies. The thirty semester- 
hours of college courses must include one course in English, one 
course in History and two in a modern language. 

Students whose major work in practical music is the Voice are 
required to complete one course in French, one in German and one 
in Italian, with special reference to diction. They are also required 
to complete course 3 to 6 inclusive, or an equivalent in piano. 
All applicants for the degree must also render a programme of at 
least two advanced selections approved by the teacher under whom 
her private instruction has been received, before a committee of 
the Faculty of the Conservatory of Music. 

The Diploma and Teachers Certificate Course. 

Requirements for the Diploma in Music: 1. All students are re- 
quired to complete courses 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10 in the Theory and 

70 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



History of Music; in addition to these courses students whose 
major study is Piano must complete course 5 in the Theory and 
History of Music; those whose major is Voice must complete 
course 4, and those whose major is Violin must complete course 6. 

2. Piano students must complete courses 3 to 10 inclusive in 
Piano. Voice students must complete courses 1 to 4 inclusive, in 
Singing. Violin students must complete courses 1 to 4 inclusive, 
in Violin. Organ students must complete courses 1 to 6 inclusive, 
in Organ. 

3. The satisfactory rendition in public entirely from memory, 
of a programme approved by the faculty of the Conservatory of 
Music. 

4. For the diploma in Voice one year of French, one of German 
and one of Italian, with special reference to diction, and courses 
3 to 6 inclusive, in Piano. 

Requirements for the Teacher's Certificate: 

1. Completion of courses 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10 in the Theory and 
History of Music. For certificate in Piano, course 5, for certifi- 
cate in Voice, course 4, for the certificate in Violin, course 6. 

2. Courses 1 to 7 inclusive in Piano, or courses 1 to 3 inclusive 
in Voice, or courses 1 to 3 inclusive in Violin, or courses 1 to 4 in- 
clusive, in Organ. 

3. The rendition of a programme of at least two advanced 
pieces, approved by the Faculty of the Conservatory of Music, 
before a Committee of that faculty. 

Courses in Practical Music (Piano, Voice, Violin, Organ.) 

The Conservatory of Music offers a great variety of courses in 
Piano, Voice, Violin and Organ, which are open to students who 
do not plan to pursue a course in music with a view to graduation. 
The regulations concerning the admission of such students are 
stated on page 68. Outlines of these courses will be found on 
pages 73-79. 

Courses in Music for Students in Brenau College. 

Students in the College may elect courses in the Theory ^and 
History of Music, which will count towards the A. B. degree sub- 
ject to the regulations stated on page 40. 

71 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Courses of Instruction 



THEORY AND HISTORY OF MUSIC 

Professors Alberti, Michaelis, and Blocker. 

1. Harmony. A study of scales, triads, seventh chords, altered 
chords, modulation, suspensions, organpoint, changing and passing 
tones, hamonization of canti firmi, composition of chorales, small 
forms and anthems. Two hours a week throughout the year. Cred- 
it: four semester-hours. 

2. Counterpoint. Original studies in simple, double, triple, 
and quadruple counterpoint in note-against-note, two-against-one, 
four-against-one, and Florid Rhythms, in two, three, four and five 
voices. Original canons and figures. Composition of small poems 
for voices, pianos, etc. Must be preceded by course 1 or an equiva- 
lent. Two hours a week throughout the year. Credit: four sem- 
ester-hours. 

3. Composition and Orchestration. Composition of chorales, 
hymns, anthems, songs, sonatas, fantasies, suites, overtures, sym- 
phonies, instrumentation and the orchestration of given and origi- 
nal works. Must be preceded by course 2 or an equivalent. Two 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit: four semester-hours. 

4. Voice Ensemble. (Solfeggio). Sight singing, study of 
works in unison; two, three, four voices and public performance 
with orchestral accompaniment. Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit: four semester-hours. 

5. Piano Ensemble. Sight-playing. Study of works for four, 
six and eight hands and public performance ensemble. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Credit: four semester- 
hours. 

6. String Ensemble. Sight-playing. Study of works for 
two, three and four violins, trios, quartets, quintets, etc., and or- 

72 



BREN A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

chestral compositions. Various combinations of string, piano and 
voice. Accompanying, public performance ensemble. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. Credit: four semester- 
hours. 

7. History of Music. Current musical events and influences. 
Development of the art of tone, earliest efforts and final achieve- 
ments. Invention and perfection of instruments. Development of 
taste and hyper-criticism. Biographical studies. Modern musical 
tendencies. Text-books and lectures. One hour a week through- 
out the year. Credit: two semester hours. 

8. Musical Pedagogy. Detailed study of instrumental technics, 
with application of methods of teaching. Model class, individual 
teaching. Psychology of early development. Musical literature 
and appreciation. One hour a week throughout the year. Credit: 
two semester-hours. 

9. Ear Training. Dictation and reproduction of single tones, 
motives, phrases and periods, rhythmic structure in two, three and 
four voices. Relative and absolute pitch. Two hours a week, one 
semester. Credit: two semester-hours. 

10. Analysis. Structural analysis of works for voices and in- 
struments. Should follow course 2. Two hours a week, one semes- 
ter. Credit: two semester-hours. 

PIANO 

Piano 1. The Keyboard. Principles of tone production. No- 
tation. Easy studies and pieces. Wagner's Pianoforte Instruc- 
tor, Vol. 1. Entrance credit: one-half unit. 

Piano 2. Collated Studies, Book II, Nos. 1-23, comprising 
selections from Lebert and Stark, Biehl, Czerny, Gurlitt, Kunz, 
Krause, Schmoll. Collated Pieces, Book I, Nos. 1-8, comprising 
selections from Spindler, Meyer, Bohm, Poldini. "Kindergarten 
March" (Pfefferkorn) ; "Beatrice" (Pfefferkorn). Album Leaves 
op. 101, Nos. 14 and 16, Gurlitt. Entrance credit: one-half unit. 

Piano 3. Pfefferkorn's Elementary Models for Chords and 
Scales, Nos. 2 and 3. Various Keys and Forms. Collated Studies, 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Book II, Nos. 24-42, comprising selections from Schmoll, 
Czerny, Lully, Duvernoy, Biehl, Loeschhorn, Kirchner. Collated 
Pieces, Book I, Nos. 9-14, comprising selections from Hitz, Lack, 
Bohm, Chopin, Schubert. Pfefferkorn's "Cradle Song*' and 
"Greeting". Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 4. Elementary Models for Chords- and Scales, Nos. 4 to 
5. Various Ke}^s and Forms. Collated Studies, Book II, Nos. 44- 
64, comprising selections from Czerny, Le Couppey, Lebert and 
Stark, Kirchner, Heller, Schmoll. Collated Pieces, Book I, Nos. 
15-24, comprising selections from Behr, Olsen, Tschaikowski, 
Scharwenka, Greig, Chopin, Spindler; Pfefferkorn's "Iris"; "Chry- 
salis"; "Song of the Nymphs"; "Eglantine". Godard's "Au 
Matin". Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 5. Models for Chords and Scales, Nos. 7, 8, 9, 10. All 
Keys and Forms. Collated Studies, Book III, Nos. 1-20, com- 
prising selections from Czerny, Bertini, Bach, Heller, Loeschhorn, 
Duvernoy, Handel, Tavan. Collated Pieces, Book II, Nos. 1-9, 
comprising selections from Chopin, Lack, Scharwenka, Korestch- 
enko, Jensen, Arensky, Spindler, Dvorak. Pfefferkorn's "Sesame", 
"Asphodel", "Daphne". Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano. 6. Models for Chords and Scales, Nos. 6, 11, 12, 13, 14; 
All Keys and Forms. Collated Studies, Book III, Nos. 21 to 26, 
comprising selections from Bach, Duvernoy, Wolff, Heller, Czerny, 
Krause. Collated Studies, Book IV, Nos.. 1-17, comprising se- 
lections from Cramer, Czerny, Bach, Krause. Collated Pieces, 
Book II, Nos. 10-18, comprising selections from Chopin, Silas, 
Mendelssohn, Dolmetsch, Hollander, Chaminade, Greig, Tschai- 
kowski, Schuett, Beethoven's Sonata, op. 26, Theme and Variation. 
Schumann's Papillons, Op. 2, Nos. 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8. Pfefferkorn's 
"Valse Lyrique", "Endymion", "Undine". "En Passant". Re- 
quired. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 7. Collated Studies, Book IV. Nos. 18-37, comprising 
selections from Bach, Paradisi, Cramer, Clementi. Collated Pieces, 
Book III, pages 35. 38, 30, 14, 8 comprising selections from Schuett, 
Greig, Rheinberger, Henselt, Tschaikowski ; Mozart Sonata in A 
major. Theme and Variations; Mendelssohn, Rondo Capriccioso, 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

op. 14; Chopin Valse, op. 42; Schumann, Fantasie Pieces, op. 12, 
Nos. lj 2, 3, 4. Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 8. Chopin Preludes, op. 28, Nos. 1, 3, 6, 11, 12, 15, 16, 
19, 20, 22, 23. Collated Pieces, Book III, pages 3, 24, 26, 12, 
18, 42. Liszt, Valse Impromptu; Schumann, Scherzo from Sonata 
in F sharp minor; Beethoven, Rondo from Sonata Pathetique; 
Chopin, Poloniase in C Sharp Minor; Rubinstein's Valse Caprice; 
Beethoven, Allegro from Sonata, op. 7; Weber, Polacca, op. 72. 
Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 9. Chopin, Etudes, op. 10, No. 2; op. 25, No. 9; op. 25, 
No. 2; op. 25, No. 7; op. 25, No. 3; op. 25, No. 1; op. 25, No. 4; 
op. 10, No. 5; op 10, No. 3. Bach, French Suites, Nos. 3, 5, 6. 
Bach, English Suites, Nos. 1, 2, 3. Beethoven, Sonata op. 31, No. 
2. Schumann, Fantasie, op. 17, (Second Part). Chopin, Scherzo 
op. 20. Brahms, Rhapsodie in G. minor. Liszt, "Gnomenreigen" ; 
"Waldesrauschen". Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 10. Chopin, Etudes, op. 10, No. 7; op. 10, No. 11 ; op. 10, 
No. 4; op. 10, No. 10; op. 25, No. 8; op. 25, No. 12; op. 10, No. 
8; op. 10, No. 12; op. 25, No. 11. Bach English Suite, No. 5. 
Bach-Liszt, Prelude and Fugue in A minor. Mendelssohn, Va- 
riations Serieuses in D minor, op. 54. Beethoven, Sonata, op. 81. 
Schumann Carnival op. 9. Chopin, Polonaise, op. 22; Sonata in 
B. minor. Strauss-Tausig, Valse Caprice, ("Man lebt nur emmal"). 
Liszt Twelfth Rhapsodie Hongroise. 

Required. Credit: six semester-hours. 

Piano 11. An elective to accompany or follow Piano 7. Caprice 
Espagnol, op. 37, Moszkowski ; Fantasie Impromptu, C sharp minor, 
Chopin; Suite in E minor, Raff; Vienna Carnival, op. 26, (1st 
part), Schumann; Sonata, op. 2, No. 2, Beethoven; Barcarolle in 
A minor, Rubinstein; Scherzo in E minor, Mendelssohn; Allegro 
Appassionata, op. 70, Saint Saens; Fugue, op. 5, Rheinberger; 
Concert Study in D flat, Brassin ; Theme and Variations in C minor, 
Beethoven; Nocturne, op. 15, No. 2, Chopin. Credit six semester- 
hours. 

Piano 12. An elective to accompany or follow Piano 8. Can- 
tique D'Amour, Liszt; Waltz Caprice in D flat. Wieniawski; Noc- 

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BRE X A U COLLEGE BULL E T I N 

turne, op. 37, No. 2, Chopin; Novelette in E, op. 7, Schumann; 
Sonata op. 2, No. 3, Beethoven; Fantasie on themes from "Alceste," 
Gluck-Saint-Saens ; Scherzo, op. 4, E flat minor, Brahms; Spinning 
Song from "Der Fliegende Hollaender," Wagner-Liszt; Maerchen 
op. 162, No. 4, Raff; Impromptu in B Flat, op. 142, 
No. 3, Schubert; Valse in E, op. 34, No. 1, Moszkowski. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 

Piano 13. An elective to accompany or follow Piano 9. Theme 
and Variations in F minor, Hayden; Momento Capriccioso, Weber; 
Rhapsodie in B minor, op. 79, No. 1 Brahms ; Marche Militaire, 
Schubert-Tausig; Sonetta del Petrarca, Liszt; Bolero in A minor, 
Chopin; Courante in E minor, Godowsky; Pesther Carnival, Liszt; 
Ballade in A flat, op. 47, Chopin; Sonata in F sharp minor (In- 
troduction, Allegro Vivace), Schumann; Chomatique Fantasie and 
Fugue, Bach-Bulow; Polonaise Fantasie, op. 61, Chopin. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 

Piano 14. An elective to accompany or follow Piano 10. Bal- 
lade in G minor, op. 24, Grieg; Scherzo in C sharp minor, op. 39, 
Chopin; Sonata in C major, op. 53, Beethoven; Concert Studies 
(a) F minor, (b) D flat, Liszt; Sonata in F minor, op. 57, Beeth- 
oven; Liebestod from "Tristan and Isolde/' Wagner-Liszt; Invita- 
tion to the Dance, Weber-Tausig; Variations on a theme by Pa- 
ganini, Book 1, Brahms; Concert Paraphrase on Chopin's Valse, 
op. 18, Godowsky; Tarantelle, "Venezia e Napoli," Liszt; Davids- 
buendler, op. 6 (18 pieces), Schumann; Ballade in G minor, op. 23, 
Chopin. Credit: six semester-hours-. 

SINGING 

Professors Alberti and McCay. Mrs. Turnipseed. 

1. Introductory Course. First principles of tone production 
and voice liberation, principles of correct breathing, explanation 
of the vocal anatomy, study of vowel values and consideration of 
the articulation of consonants, position in singing, original vocal- 
ises with all the vowels, vocalises (selected) to cover some of the 
following: sustained singing: sustained singing (attack, legato, porta- 

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BREN A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 



mento), scales, repeated notes, time, rhythm, arpeggi, grace notes 
(appoggiature, acciaccature), mordents, turns, trills, chromatic 
scales. Simple songs. For first year students. Throughout the 
year. Credit, with practice required: six semester-hours. 

2. Vocalises (selected) to cover the following: sustained 
singing (canto, ipianato, messa di voce), rhythm, phrasing, techni- 
cal studies to supplement the first year's work, studies in agility, 
style and interpretation, exercises in Italian, exercises in diction. 
Intermediate songs. For students who have had course 1 or an 
equivalent. Throughout the year. Credit, with required practice: 
six semester-hours. 

3. Advanced Technical studies, phrasing, styles of technique 
(Bel Canto, Diction, Dramatic, Bravura, Recitative). Songs se- 
lected from the classical song literature (Old French, German, 
and Italian), and sung in their original text. For students who 
have had courses 1 and 2 or equivalents. Throughout the year. 

Credit for each term with required practice: six semester-hours. 

4. Advanced Technical Studies. Studies in interpretation 
and style. Study of the classification of songs. Program making. 
Study of the classical song and operatic literature and some of the 
principal oratorii. Preparation of recital program and all that 
is necessary for a public appearance in recital (stage deportment, 
etc.) For Seniors. Throughout the year. Credit, for each semes- 
ter with practice required: six semester-hours. 

ORGAN 

Professor Wilson, Miss Peterman. 

The course for the organ should be preceded by at least two 
years in the study of the piano, otherwise much time will be wasted 
in acquiring a manual technic at the organ before the salient fea- 
tures of this instrument can be mastered. 

1. Introductory Course. Study of manuals, with exercises 
and small pieces exemplary of sustained and detached styles. 
Credit, with required practice: six semester-hours. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

2. Study of Pedals. With etudes, hymns, canons, fugue, etc. 
Credit, with required practice: six semester-hours. 

3. Intermediate Course. Chorales and fantasies. Mechani- 
cal construction of the organ. For those who have had 1 and 2 
or equivalents. Credit, with required practice: six semester-hours. 

4. A Continuation of Course 3. Improvisation; the service of 
the church, and masterworks for the instrument. Second term. 
Credit, with required practice: six semester-hours. 

5. Advanced Course. Concertos and other recital composi- 
tions. Students in this course and course 6 will serve in rotation as 
organists in the chapel exercises of the College. Credit, with re- 
quired practice: six semester-hours. 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Supplemented by a public re- 
cital program of representative compositions, and by improvisa- 
tion upon a given theme. Credit, with required practice: six sem- 
ester-hours. 

VIOLIN 

Professor Michaelis. 
Violin 1 : 

This course embraces: (1) Training for the acquisition of a 
correct position in holding the violin and bow. (2) Cultivation 
of technic for fingers and the bow. (3) Exercises in intonation, 
such as scales, etudes and pieces in the first position. (Hermann, 
Violin School, Book I, complete; Miff el's Graded Course of Pieces. 
Book I.) Credit for each term: six semester-hours. 

Violin 2: 

(1) The positions and the change of positions. Scales and exer- 
cises for shifting in the seven positions. (Hermann, Violin School. 
Book II, division IV and V.) (2) Pieces for the development of 
style and interpretation. (Miffel's Graded Course of Pieces, 
Book II.) Credit for each term: six semester-hours. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Violin 3: 

(1) Exercises for technic in general and for the cultivation of 
tone. (Hermann, Violin School, Book II, division VI.) (2) Study 
of the easier Concertos and Sonatas as well as solo pieces; Svend- 
son, Romanze, Mlynarski, Mazurka, Ries, Suite No. Ill, etc. 

Violin 4: 

(1) Cultivation of the higher technic of fingers and bow. (Etudes 
by Rade, Gavines and Paganini.) (2) Study of advanced classi- 
cal and modern Concertos and Sonatas; such as Bruch, op. 26; 
Mendelssohn, op. 64; Wieniawski, op. 22; Greig, op. 8. (3) Train- 
ing in sight reading and ensemble playing. Credit for each term: 
six semester-hours. 



79 



Literary Courses for Conservatory 
Students 



Students in the Conservatory who have met the requirements 
for entrance to the Freshman Class of the College may elect col- 
lege courses for which they have had the required preparation. 
In addition to college courses, the Conservatory provides work in 
English and History (required for the Oratory certificate) and in 
German, French and Italian (required for the diploma and certifi- 
cate of the Voice Department), and these courses are open to Con- 
servatory students other than those who are required to take them. 



Courses of Instruction in Literary Subjects 



ENGLISH 

Mrs. Leonard. 



1. English Composition and Literature. This is a course 
in English including composition and literature presented as inter- 
dependent and correlated subjects. The theme work is made the 
outgrowth of the student's experience and of her study of the English 
classics. This course or an equivalent is required of students in 
the Certificate Course in Oratory, and is open to other Conserva- 
tory students. Four hours a week throughout the year. 

2. Composition and Rhetoric. More advanced work in de- 
scription, narration, exposition and argument. Frequent themes are 
required, and a course of reading is prescribed. Required of stu- 
dents in the Certificate Course in Oratory, and open to other Con- 
servatory students Four hours a week throughout the year. 

3. English and American Literature. This includes a gen- 
eral survey of English and American Literature, and is designed 

80 



BBENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

to furnish those students who do not elect further courses an 
opportunity to become acquainted with the main facts of literary 
history. The characteristics of the various periods of literary de- 
velopment will be emphasized^ and selected masterpieces represen- 
tative of these periods will be studied. Required of students in 
the Certificate Course in Oratory, and open to other Conservatory 
students. Four hours a week throughout the year. 

FRENCH 

1. Elementary French. This is a course for beginners and 
is especially adapted to the needs of Conservatory students. It 
consists of careful drill in pronunciation, the rudiments of gram- 
mar, easy exercises of translation of French into English, conver- 
sation and reading of about three hundred pages of easy prose. 
Required of Voice students in the Diploma and Certificate courses. 
Open to Conservatory students in other courses. Four hours a 
week throughout the year. 

2. Second Year French. A continuation of French 1. It 
includes constant practice of translation into French of easy Eng- 
lish, drills in grammar, conversation, and the reading of about 
four hundred pages of easy modern prose. For Conservatory stu- 
dents who have had course I or an equivalent. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. 

GERMAN 

1. Elementary German. A course for beginners, especially 
adapted to the needs of Conservatory students. Careful drill is 
given in pronunciation, the rudiments of grammar, and the trans- 
lation of about three hundred pages of easy prose is required. Re- 
quired of Voice students in the Diploma and Certificate courses 
and open to Conservatory students in other courses. Four hours 
a week throughout the year. 

2. Second Year German. This course is a continuation of 
course 1. It consists of drills in grammar, conversation and writ- 
ing in German, and the reading of about four hundred pages of 

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BRE N A U COLL K G E BULL E T I N 

easy modern prose. For Conservatory students in Certificate 
courses who have had German 1. Three hours a week throughout 
the year. 

ITALIAN 

1. Elementary Italian. This is a course especially adapted 
to the needs of music students. It includes drill in pronunciation 
and grammar, and the reading of about two hundred pages of 
modern Italian prose. Required of Voice students in the Diploma 
and Certificate courses. Open to other Conservatory students. 
Three hours a week throughout the year. 

HISTORY 

Miss Harris. 

1. Ancient History. This course covers the history of the 
development of civilization in the Ancient East, in Greece and 
Home, the invasions of the German Barbarians, and the rise of 
Christian Church and the Frankish State to about 800 A. D. Re- 
quired of students in the Certificate Course in the School of Ora- 
tory and open to other Conservatory students. Four hours a week 
throughout the year. 

2. Modern History. An outline course covering the develop- 
ment of Western civilization from the ninth century to the present 
time. Required of students in the Certificate Course in The School 
of Oratory, and open to other Conservatory students. Four hours 
a week throughout the year. 



82 



Courses of Study in the School of 
Oratory 



The School of Oratory offers two courses of study: 

The Course leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Oratory 

(B.O.). 

The Course leading to the Certificate in Oratory. 
Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Oratory: 

1. Sixty semester-hours of credit in the courses offered by Bre- 
nau College, including twenty semester-hours in English, twelve 
semester-hours in History, twelve semester-hours in French or Ger- 
man, six semester-hours in Logic and Psychology. Ten extra sem- 
ester-hours in any of the above courses. 

2. Sixty semester-hours of credit in the courses offered by the 
School of Oratory, including courses in Oratory, Speaking Voice, 
Physical Training, Literary Interpretation, Original Work, The 
Drama, Dramatic Art, Platform Art. 

(For description of courses, see page 84.) 

THE COURSE LEADING TO THE CERTIFICATE IN 

ORATORY. 

The requirements for the Certificate in Oratory are: 

1. Courses 1, 2, 3 in Conservatory English (see page 80), 
or their equivalent, and fourteen semester-hours in college English. 

2. Sixty semester-hours of credit in courses offered by the 
School of Oratory, including the same general subjects in Oratory 
as those required for the degree. 

COURSES IN ORATORY FOR STUDENTS IN BRENAU 

COLLEGE 

Students in Brenau College may elect courses in Oratory for 
which credit towards the A.B. degree is given in accordance with 
the regulations stated on page 40. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

There is an extra charge for courses in Public Speaking, but a 
regular student in the College may elect any one of the courses 
described below, except I, 5, III, VI, 2, VIII, without extra charge. 
Of the maximum of twenty-four semester-hours which may be 
counted for the A.B. degree, not more than eight may be counted 
in any one year. 

Courses of Instruction 

Professors Overton and Salls., Misses Chaffee and Blanton. 



I. ORATORY 

1. History of Oratory: (a) Lives and times of Great Orators. 
(b) Critical study and declamation of typical orations. 1 hour 
a week throughout the year. Credit: one semester-hour. 

2. Argumentation and Debate. 

(a) Principles of Argumentation and practice Debating in 
class and two Assembly Debates. One hour a week, first 
term. Credit: one semester-hour. 

(b) Four Assembly Debates to follow the class work for criti- 
cism in Debate and Forensic Delivery. Credit: one sem- 
ester-hour. 

3. Original Addresses. 

Junior, minimum 20 minutes. Credit: one semester-hour. 
Senior, minimum 20 minutes. Credit: one semester-hour. 

4. Extemporary Speaking. 

Discussion before Assembly upon current and timely topics 
assigned, 3 outlined and 3 spontaneous, 6 speeches, 3 to 5 
minutes each. Credit: one semester-hour. 

5. Parliamentary Rules, and Conduct of Meetings. One hour 
throughout the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



II. THE SPEAKING VOICE 

1. Voice Training: 

(a) Study of Vocal Physiology. Use of Vocal Organs : breath- 
ing, tone placing, resonance, flexibility, etc. Articulation 
and pronunciation. 1-2 hour, throughout the year. Cred- 
it: one semester hour. 

(b) Elements of Expressive Voice. Forms of emphasis, 
force, pitch, volume, quality. Flexibility, projection, 
brilliancy, color, etc. 1-2 hour throughout the year. Cred- 
it: one semester-hour. 

(c) Vocal Physiology (advanced work). Elements of Speech. 
Expressive Voice — exercises from Tennyson, Shakespeare, 
Kipling, Poe and others. 1-2 hour throughout the year. 
Credit: one semester-hour. 

(d) Tone Chart. Character in tone. Analysis of Literature 
for vocal expression. Rendering of selections for exclu- 
sive voice criticism. 1-2 hour throughout the year. Cred- 
it: one semester hour. 

2. Visible Speech: 

(a) Elements of Speech, Diacritical Marks, Principles of 
Pronunciation and Articulation, Visible Speech Symbols. 
One hour throughout the year. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

(b) Study of Correct English Pronunciation, Vocal Defects 
and their cure, Visible Speech Symbols and the English 
Dictionary. One hour throughout the year. Credit: two 
semester-hours. 

III. PHYSICAL TRAINING 

1. Educational Gymnastics: 

(a) Health Exercises: Corrective Gymnastics to aid func- 
tion; to develop form. Breathing. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

(b) Gymnastic Exercises: Swedish work, Calisthenics, Tac- 
tics, Bells, Wands. 

(c) Recreative Exercises: Tennis, Hockey, Basketball and 
other games. 

Three hours, both terms. Credit: two semester-hours. 

2. Educational and Aesthetic Physical Work: 

(a) Advanced Swedish Work, Bells, Wands, Clubs. 

(b) Games and Out Door Sports. 

(c) Artistic Gymnastics, Dalcrose Rhythmic Work, Fancy 
Marches and Folk Dances. Emerson Exercises. 

Three hours throughout the year. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

3. Advanced Work in Above Courses. Fencing and Heavy Ap- 
paratus introduced. Three hours, both terms. Credit: two 
semester-hours. 

4. Advanced Work in Above Courses. Physiology and Anatomy. 
Theory work. Three hours, both terms. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

5. Expressive Physical Training: 

(a) Responsive Gesture Drill from nerve centers for unity, 
grace, positiveness of bodily expression. Responsive Ges- 
ture Drill from mental stimulus. One-half hour, both 
terms. Credit: one semester-hour. 

(b) Theory of Gesture: General principles of affirmation 
and negation through response, life studies, technical 
terms. One hour, first term. Credit: one semester-hour. 

(c) Theory of Gesture: Foot chart, arm chart, etc. Study 
of character as interpreted through gesture and attitude 
and habitual expression. One hour, second term. Credit: 
one semester-hour. 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Pantomime : 

(a) Detail work of all parts of body in characters and situa- 
tions. Group work. One hour, both terms. Credit: two- 
semester hours. 

(b) Original Living "Motion Pictures''. Presentation of 
scenes from life, also from the Drama. One hour, both 
terms. Credit: two semester-hours. 



IV. LITERARY INTERPRETATION 

1. Evolution of Expression. Lectures upon the history of evo- 
lution in art. Practical application to literary interpretation 
of psychological principles underlying the development of any 
art. Study of central idea in its obvious intent. Relationship 
of parts. Oral practice in interpretation. Text-books: Emer- 
son's "Evolution of Expression", Volumes I and II. Two hours 
a week throughout the year. Credit: four semester hours. 

2. Evolution of Expression. Volumes III and IV. Two hours 
throughout the year. Credit: four semester-hours. 

3. Sight Reading. One hour, both terms. Credit: one semester- 
hour. 

4. Literary Analysis and Interpretation. 

(a) Analysis of Prose Forms: Address, Narrative, Mono- 
log, The Drama. Studies from Dickens, Scott, Thack- 
eray, Eliot, Hugo, and others. 

(b) Analysis of Poetic Forms: Lyric, Dramatic, Epic, Mono- 
log, The Drama. Studies from Shakespeare, Tennyson. 
Browning. Wordsworth, Longfellow, and others. 

(c) Adaptation and abridgment of poems and novels for 
platform work. Introductions to selections and arrange- 
ments. Original stories and monologs. 

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BRE X A U C O L L K U E BULLETIN 



(d) Bible Reading. 

Two hours throughout the year. Credit: four semester- 
hours. 

5. Advanced Course in Literary Analysis. One hour through- 
out the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

6. Browning and the Dramatic Monolog. One hour, both 
terms. Credit: two semester-hours. 

V. ORIGINAL WORK 

1. Assembly Work, including Debate (I 2); Parliamentary Law 
and Debate (T 5), Extempore (I 4), Junior and Senior Ad- 
dresses (I 3). Junior and Senior Plays (VII 3), Arrange- 
ment of Selections (IV 4c, and V 2b), Monologs (IV 4c and 
VIII 4 and 5) is required to complete the credit on the 
course which the public work represents. 

2. Junior Original Work Class. 

(a) Spontaneous and Prepared Introductions of Imaginary 
Speakers, Original Addresses, After Dinner Speeches and 
Toasts for imaginary occasions. 

(b) Arrangements of selections for platform use. Introduc- 
tions to selections. 

(c) Story Telling. 

One hour throughout the year. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

3. Senior Original Work Class. Story Telling, Scenario Writ- 
ing, Play writing. Practice work in each during first term. 
One good original example of each during second term. Two 
hours, both terms. Credit: four semester-hours. 

4. Normal Class. Practice Teaching under Faculty direction. 
Study of Methods. Each Senior must also substitute for Fac- 

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BRENAU COLLEGE BULLET IX 



ulty members when assigned to classes and must give a mini- 
mum of ten private lessons to Freshmen. One hour through- 
out the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

VI. THE DRAMA 

Development of the English Drama. Miracle, Mystery, 
Morality Plays. The rise of comedy and tragedy. The work 
of the predecessors and contemporaries of Shakespeare as re- 
lated to his development. Two hours, both terms. Credit: 
four semester-hours. 

Shakespearean Drama. 

(a) Studies in Shakespeare (see College Course, English F 2.) 
Two hours, both terms. Credit: four semester-hours. 

(b) Literary and Dramatic interpretation of three of the 
plays. Presentation of scenes at each class meeting. 
Presentation in public of at least one play each year. 

1 Comedy to be selected. One hour, both terms. Cred- 
it: two semester-hours. 

Macbeth. One hour, both terms. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

Hamlet. One hour, both terms. Credit: two semester- 
hours. 

Modern Drama. 

I. Introduction. 

(a) Before Ibsen. 

1. Victor Hugo and the Romantic Movement. 

2. Cardou, Scribe, and Dumas-Fils. 

(b) Technique of the Drama. 

II. Scandinavian Dramatists: Ibsen, Bjornson. 

III. German Dramatists: Hauptmann, Sudermann. 

IV. French Dramatists: Maeterlinck (Belgian), Hervien. 

V. English Dramatists: Galsworthy, Barker, Jones, Pinero. 

89 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

VI. Irish Dramatists: Shaw, Yeats, Synge, Lady Gregory. 

VII. American Dramatists: Moody, Mackaye, Peabody, 

Thomas. 
Two hours a week throughout the year. Credit: four semes- 
ter-hours. 

VII. DRAMATIC ART. 

1. Stage Technique and Dramatic Art. Platform methods and 
traditions. Correct attitudes and movements in entrance, exit, 
walking, sitting. Stage business, coaching and management 
of plays. Selection of good plays, for amateurs. One act plays 
for criticism in characterization, stage business, make-up, cos- 
tuming, rehearsals. One hour a week throughout the year. 
Credit: two semester-hours. 

2. Classical Dramas. Literary study and dramatic interpreta- 
tion of plays from Shakespeare. Study of other classic drama. 
Public presentation of at least one play of Shakespeare during 
each year. Credit given in VI 2. 

3. Original Plays. 

(a) Modern methods in play structure and scenario writing. 
Each member of the class is required to complete one 
play and one scenario. 

(b) Each Junior and each Senior must dramatize a novel or 
short story, or construct an original plot, write the play, 
cast the characters, coach and manage the presentation 
before the Assembly. Credit for Juniors: one semester- 
hour. Credit for Seniors: one semester-hour. 

4. Pantomime, (a) Presentation of Songs of Hiawatha or 
other narrative in costumed pantomime for studies in bodily 
expression. Credit under III 6. 

5. Make-up. The student learns to transform a face into any 
age or nationality by means of the modern harmless grease 

90 



BBENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



paints. The school is equipped with a special make-up table 
with individual mirrors, electric lights, etc., accommodating a 
large class. Make-up box, $2.50 extra. 

One hour, both terms. Credit: one semester-hour. 

VIII. PLATFORM ART 

1. Poetry. Studies from Classic and Modern Poets. 

2. Prose. The Novel, the Short Story— original and borrowed 

things. 

Presented under IV 1, and VIII 5. 

3. Impersonations. Narrative, Dramatic and Character Mono- 
logues. 

Presented under VIII 4 and 5. 

4. Dialect. Child dialect, Scotch, Irish, French. Cockney, 
Japanese, Italian, Swedish, German, Negro dialect. 

a. Study of racial characteristics. 

b. Study of physiognomy and bodily expressions, with such 

aids as Darwin and James. 
One hour, both terms. Credit: two semester-hours. 

5 Individual Instruction on Platform Selections. Each 
student receives one hour criticism a week in groups of three 
from a professor and one-half hour individual criticism a week 
from an instructor. One and one-half hours a week through- 
out the four years course. Credit, each year: three semester- 
hours. 

6. Assembly. All students of Expression are expected to meet 
in Assembly Hall to form an audience for practice work in all 
forms of Public Speaking. Three hours a week throughout 
the four years course. Required for credit in above courses. 

7. Repertoire. Two hundred and fifty minutes of recital work, 
one-half of which must be presented in Assembly recitals. 

91 



B R E N AU COLLEGE BULLETIN 
Credit for this work is included in VIII 5 above. 

8. Senior Recitals. 

(a) B.O. Senior recitals, fifty to eighty minutes, one selection 
arranged from drama or novel. Twenty extra half -hour 
lessons will be given Oratory Seniors. Credit: two semes- 
ter hours. 

(b) Certificate recitals, thirty to forty minutes, consisting of 
at least two selections. Ten extra half -hour lessons will 
be given certificate students. Two students must appear 
on these certificate recital programs. Credit: one semes- 
ter hour. 

ASSEMBLY EXERCISES 

The Brenau School of Oratory meets in Assembly Hall at nine 
o'clock four mornings each week. General exercises for the culture 
of voice and body are conducted by the teachers. Following these 
opening exercises, on Tuesdays and Fridays, platform selections 
are rendered by members of the school and on Wednesdays and Sat- 
urdays the time is devoted to extemporaneous speaking, debates, ad- 
dresses by Juniors, and Seniors, original plays, etc., etc. One of 
the favorite exercises is the monthly "Pronunciation Match." Visi- 
tors are always welcome. 

RECITALS AND PLAYS 

Twice each week in Assembly Exercises the students appear in 
recital work. Once each month a program is presented to the 
public. Two classic plays are given each year in addition to numer- 
ous modern comedies and one-act sketches. The recitals and plays 
together with an annual Gymnastic Exhibition and Field Day Exer- 
cises provide opportunities for platform practice and experience, 
and at the same time prove a test of progress. 



92 



Art Department 

The Art Department offers the following courses of study: 

The Course leading to the Diploma in Art. 

The course leading to the Teacher's Certificate in Art. 

Courses in the Practice of Art. 

Courses for students of Brenau College. 

THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DIPLOMA IN ART 

The requirements for the Diploma in Art are: 

1. A minimum of thirty semester hours of credit from among 
the courses offered by Brenau College, including at least one course 
in English, one course in History, two courses in modern foreign 
languages. The remaining courses must be chosen under the di- 
rection of the Head of the Art Department. 

2. A minimum of seventy-two semester-hours from among the 
courses offered by the Art Department, including at least six sem- 
ester-hours in the History of Art, and courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 
10, 11, 12, in the Theory and Practice of Art. 

3. The remaining credit required for the diploma may be 
earned by completing other college courses and courses in Art, 
under the direction of the Head of the Art Department. 

THE COURSE LEADING TO THE CERTIFICATE IN ART 

Students who do not take the college work required for the 
Diploma in Art but who desire to work for a certificate in this 
branch must take the prescribed courses in the History of Art 
and the Theory and Practice of Art. 

COURSES IN THE PRACTICE OF ART 

Special courses may be pursued by students desiring to study 
Art without a view to graduation. Such students are classified for 
purposes of instruction, according to the character of work ac- 
complished. 

COURSES FOR STUDENTS IN BRENAU COLLEGE 

Courses in the Theory and History of Art which are open to 
students in Brenau College, are described on page 58. Credit 
for these courses is granted in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments for the A.B. degree. 

93 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Courses of Instruction 

Professor Weygandt. 



HISTORY OF ART 

1. Introductory Course. This course comprises a general out- 
line of the history of graphic art, and biographical study of the 
great masters. It is given as a college course (see page 40). 
Text-book, readings and recitations. One hour a week throughout 
the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

2. History of Architecture. This course includes a detailed 
study of the leading styles of architecture, with selected types for 
illustrative purposes. Text-books, lectures, readings, recitations. 
For Sophomore in the regular course in Art. One hour a week 
throughout the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

3. History of Painting. An advanced course for Juniors and 
Seniors. It fncludes a careful study of modern painting from the 
Renaissance to the present time. One hour a week throughout the 
year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

4. Masterpieces of Sculpture, Architecture and Painting. 
An advanced course, the purpose of which is to show the historical 
development of art by illustration and discussion of masterpieces 
in thes^ three fields. For Seniors in Art. One hour a week through- 
out the year. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ART. 

Professor Weygandt. 

1. Principles of Criticism. An elementary course designed to 
lead the student to an intelligent appreciation of the beauty and 
meaning of works of art. Copies of some of the masterpieces are 
studied and criticised from the artistic standpoint. Lectures, dis- 
cussions, papers. This course, or an equivalent, is required of all 

94 



BBENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



regular art students, and must be taken as part of their first year's 
work. One hour a week throughout the year. Credit: two sem- 
ester-hours. 

2. Freehand Perspective. The purpose of this course is the 
instruction of the student in the principles upon which sketching 
from still life and from nature is based. For first year students. 
Credit: six semester-hours. 

3. Advanced Perspective. A course similar in purpose to 
course 2, and open to those who have had that course or an equiva- 
lent. Credit: six semester-hours. 

4. Elements of Design. The study of design as an art ac- 
tivity fundamental to the fine arts and the crafts. Lectures, study 
of examples, readings, exercises. For first year students. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 

5. Applied Design. Problems of design applied in china paint- 
ing, stenciling, jewelry, posters, lettering. For students who have 
had course 4 or an equivalent. Credit: six semester-hours. 

6. Cast Drawing. Charcoal and pencil drawing in outline and 
simple values from still life, geometric solids, casts of ornaments 
and payments from the antique. For first year students. Three 
periods a week throughout the year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

7. Cast Drawing. The human head and figure are the princi- 
pal subjects of study in this course. For students who have had 
course 6 or an equivalent. Three periods a week throughout the 
year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

8. Water Color Painting. Painting from still life, flowers, 
fruits, etc., in water colors. Open to first year students. Three 
periods throughout the year. Credit: six semester-Tiours. 

9. Water Color Painting. A course for students who have 
had course 8 or an equivalent. Three periods throughout the 
year. Credit: six semester-hours. 

10. Pictorial Composition. Study and practice in the making 
of pictures. This is required of all students in the Art Depart- 

95 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ment, who meet together once a week throughout their course, in 
this class. Credit: two semester-hours. 

11. Mechanical Drawing. A course in elementary construc- 
tive drawing. For regular students in the second year. One period 
a week throughout the year. Credit: two semester-hours. 

12. Life Drawing. Charcoal studies from life. For students 
who have had courses 6 and 7 or their equivalent. Four periods a 
week throughout the year. Credit: eight semester-hours. 

13. Oil Painting. Painting from still life, fruit, flowers, 
sketching from Nature. For students in their second or third 
year. Four periods a week throughout the year. Credit: eight 
semester-hours. 

14. Oil Painting. Life studies in oil. Must be preceded by 
course 13 or an equivalent. Four periods throughout the year. 
Credit: eight semester-hours. 

15. China Painting. This course must be preceded or ac- 
companied by courses in drawing and design. It may be taken as 
a half course or as a full course. The full course required, six 
periods a week. Credit: six semester-hours. 

16. Metal Work. This course must be preceded or accom- 
panied by work in drawing and design. It includes instruction in 
work in copper and in the advanced grade, in the precious metals, 
stone setting and jewelry forms. It may be pursued through one 
or two years. Three periods a week throughout the year. Credit: 
six semester-hours. 



96 



Register of Students 

IN THE COLLEGE 



SENIORS. 



Cora Anderson Georgia 

Bessie Lamar Anderson Alabama 

Jessie Bounds Mississippi 

Annabel Corbett Georgia 

Aline Fuller Georgia 

, Bertha Gardner Georgia 

Rosa Gillen Georgia 

Frances Jennings North Carolina 

Iris Johnson Mississippi 

Eunice Johns South Carolina 

Methyl Jordan Massachusetts 

Irene Macy Indiana 

Mary Penick Georgia 

Callie Mae Pinkston Georgia 

Ruth Reed Georgia 

Madge Robertson Georgia 

Neta Stuckey Georgia 

Louise White Georgia 

Alberta Wright Georgia 

JUNIORS. 

Mary Andrews Georgia 

Blanche Atkins Georgia 

Ruth Belk , Georgia 

Laura Brown Mississippi 

Louise Carson Kentucky 

Amy Childs Georgia 

Lee Cheney Georgia 

Emma Clark South Carolina 

Dorothy Ford Kentucky 

Margaret Goff South Dakota 

Mary Jewell Georgia 

Rose Johnson Georgia 

Betty Johnston Iowa 

Hallie Lancaster Alabama 

Kate Simmons Georgia 

Irene Thompson Georgia 

Eloise Thomas Georgia 

97 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLET! N 



SOPHOMORES. 

Vivian Alexander Georgia 

Ethel Banks Georgia 

Flo Carter Florida 

Ruth Clark Georgia 

Lucile Cox Georgia 

Helen Dean Georgia 

Winnie Dean Georgia 

Lucy Donaldson Georgia 

Evelyn DuBose Georgia 

Mary Dupre South Carolina 

Genevieve Groome Virginia 

Ernestine Hamm Georgia 

Helen Kauffman Ohio 

Sara King Georgia 

Rebecca Kenan Alabama 

Rena Meek Iowa 

wSusie Murphree Georgia 

Nelta Murray Georgia 

Grace Musser , Louisiana 

Mabelle McDorman Ohio 

Martha McConnell Georgia 

Lucile McWhorter South Carolina 

Rachel Place Pennsylvania 

Marion Pruitt Georgia 

Edith Rambo Georgia 

Inez Ruger Pennsylvania 

Eugenia Russell North Carolina 

Claire Sheppard Florida 

Frances Simms Alabama 

Elsie Smith Georgia 

Nannie Lou Stephens Georgia 

Harriet Thompson Georgia 

Lilla Todd South Carolina 

Pauline Veach Kentucky 

Louise Williams Tennessee 

FRESHMEN. 

Elizabeth Adams Texas 

Margaret Allen Georgia 

Frances Anderson South Carolina 

Mildred Andoe Georgia 

Mary Dell Ard Alabama 

Alice Bell Alabama 

Hazel Bishop Mississippi 

Sadie Bell Braselton Georgia 

98 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Margaret Brister Mississippi 

Virginia Dare Brister Mississippi 

Ruth Caldwell Ohio 

Addie Carmichael Alabama 

Marguerite Chamblee Georgia 

Rebie Cooper Georgia 

Helen Crandall Georgia 

Elizabeth Davis Alabama 

Frances Davis South Carolina 

Mary Deen Georgia 

Dorothy Dean Georgia 

Clara Dean Alabama 

Maud Derrick Georgia 

Electra Dickson Alabama 

Marjorie Dickerson Mississippi 

Helen Dowling Alabama 

Christine Edwards Georgia 

Elsie Ficker North Carolina 

Katherine Fletcher North Carolina 

Louise Finch Illinois 

Pearl Floyd Georgia 

Man' Garrett Texas 

Frances Gilliam South Carolina 

Sue Gift Indiana 

Mary Goode Georgia 

Josie Griffin South Carolina 

Martha Groover Georgia 

Louise Gunnells Alabama 

Edna Guilford North Carolina 

Bobbie Haney Mississippi 

Anna Lea Harbison Tennessee 

Helen Harris South Carolina 

Leslie Harris Mississippi 

Chester Head Georgia 

Idalette Henry Mississippi 

Frances Hobbs Georgia 

Marjorie Holmes Georgia 

Carmen Houston Mississippi 

Lloyd Howell Georgia 

Henri Ingram Georgia 

Hazel Land Arkansas 

Elaine Massey Mississippi 

Deborah Miller Indiana 

Lucille Moore South Carolina 

Hazel Morningstar New Mexico 

Willie Moss Kentucky 

Minnie McCall Georgia 

Virginia McFadgen North Carolina 

99 



B R /; N AC COLLEGE B ULLE T 1 N 

Alidah McLemore Alabama 

Florrie McMullen Georgia 

Nell Newman Georgia 

Stella Mae Orr Alabama 

DeWeese Overstreet Georgia 

Esther Patrick Tennessee 

Helen Patterson Georgia 

Gussie Peebles Georgia 

Anna Mary Powers Georgia 

Ethel Smith Georgia 

Irene Smith Georgia 

Jennie Stanley Texas 

Minnie Sweatman Mississippi 

Virginia Stephens Georgia 

Sallie Towles Alabama 

Agnes Townsend South Carolina 

lone Tumlin Georgia 

Kathleen Walton Georgia 

Fannie White Georgia 

Fannie Whelchel Georgia 

Florence Wright Georgia 

Louise Wright Georgia 

COLLEGE IRREGULARS. 

Helen Alford Georgia 

Maud Benjamin , Tennessee 

Ola Bethune Mississippi 

Lucile Biggs Missouri 

Eva Boykin Georgia 

Mary Cantrell Georgia 

lone Carter Florida 

Florence Cole Virginia 

Evelyn Crom Florida 

Hazel Curtis Mississippi 

Nell Dimon Georgia 

Gertrude Dowling Alabama 

Ella Downing Alabama 

Lillian Downing Alabama 

Lula Belle Ellis Alabama 

Helen Duggan Georgia 

Maurice Fagan Georgia 

Pauline Fuller Georgia 

Helen Gahring Missouri 

Delia Gilson Kentucky 

Lillian George Georgia 

Bess Harbeson Florida 

Lucile Hattaway Georgia 

100 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Edith Hines Georgia 

Mary Houston Georgia 

Lucy Kimbrough Georgia 

Annie Kieve Georgia 

Mary Logan Georgia 

Ruby McGaughey Georgia 

Carrie Mae McKenzie Georgia 

Isabel Miller Texas 

Alice Mitchell Alabama 

Annie Laurie Page Georgia 

Mary Parker Georgia 

Sadie Shelton Alabama 

Helen Shough Ohio 

Helen Shropshire Alabama 

Eva Simpson Georgia 

Agnes Smith Georgia 

Velma Smith Georgia 

Marie Trawick Georgia 

Louise Tucker Georgia 

Lucy Walters Alabama 

Lillian Wilkes Georgia 

Florence Wilson Virginia 

COLLEGE SPECIALS. 

Kate Anderson Georgia 

Willie Belle Anthony Georgia 

Katherine Higgins Illinois 

Mrs. J. E. Telford Georgia 

IN THE CONSERVATORY. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Ruby Ellis, Mus. B., 1911 Florida 

Ruby McGaughey, Mus. B., 1915 Georgia 

Henry Stewart, Mus. B., 1915 Georgia 

SENIORS. 

Eleanor Boeschenstein Illinois 

Mary Cantrell Georgia 

Lula Belle Ellis Alabama 

Lillian George Georgia 

Mary Logan Georgia 

Irene McCarthy New York 

Lida Parham Georgia 

Bernice Pearce Georgia 

Isabelle Padgett Florida 

Helen Wait Michigan 

101 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

JUNIORS. 

Wilhelmina Barrick West Virginia 

Maud Benjamin Tennessee 

Susie Bethune Georgia 

Estil Blocker, A.B., 1902 Georgia 

Marian Brooks Georgia 

Caryl Brigham Georgia 

Sara Conyers South Carolina 

Zelma Cox Alabama 

Hinda Farbstein Georgia 

Helen Gahring Missouri 

Mary Lee Hampton Florida 

Lucile Hattaway Georgia 

Grace Huggins Mississippi 

Ceres Humber Georgia 

Elizabeth Knauth Florida 

Miriam Mays Florida 

Isabel Miller Texas 

Carrie May McKenzie Georgia 

Eunice Pitt Georgia 

Mildred Pyles Florida 

Katherine Rickenbrode New York 

Zera Smith Alabama 

Velma Smith Tennessee 

Edna Stallworth South Carolina 

Marian VanLandingham Georgia 

Hallie Varnadoe Georgia 

Pallas Wright Florida 

Rebecca Westmoreland South Carolina 

SOPHOMORES. 

Grace Alexander Texas 

Helen Alford Georgia 

Christine Avery Alabama 

Myrtice Avant Alabama 

Lloyd Bond Florida 

Eva Boykin Georgia 

Virginia Cassill Georgia 

Tommie Chandler Georgia 

Grace Cochrane Alabama 

Agnes Conoly Georgia 

Hazel Curtis Mississippi 

Marie Davidson Georgia 

Sarah Driver Alabama 

Edith Eppes Florida 

Pauline Fuller Georgia 

102 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLET I X 

Ruth Gaines Georgia 

Mildred George Mississippi 

Nan Goodwin Texas 

Edith Hines Georgia 

Katherine Higgins Illinois 

Alma Kendrick Georgia 

Mattie Lou Lockwood Kentucky 

Adele Martin (A. B. Thornwell College) South Carolina 

Augusta Mattison Alabama 

Mary Moss Kentucky 

Hallie McClure Georgia 

Mary Newman Georgia 

Lula Newman Georgia 

Colene Pierce Georgia 

Idella Powell Georgia 

Maud Robles Florida 

Sadie Shelton Alabama 

Helen Shoucrh Ohio 

Marv R. Simms Georgia 

Mary Gullette Smith (A.B., 1915) Georgia 

Marcia Stewart Illinois 

Mary Thrasher Georgia 

Marie Trawick Georgia 

Annie Ruth Wade Alabama 

Lola Waldrop Alabama 

Fannie Waxelbaum Georgia 

Lois Young Georgia 

FRESHMEN. 

Clyde Bell Alabama 

Winifred Browning Florida 

Ruth Burkhead Alabama 

Susette DeLoach Georgia 

Neva Dickey Alabama 

Helen Duggan Georgia 

Dorothy Dyer Georgia 

Dorothy Frank Wisconsin 

Delia Gilson Kentucky 

Edith Griner Georgia 

Lucile Grant Alabama 

Edith Gunnells Alabama 

Bracey Herrin Alabama 

Anna Kieve Georgia 

Emma Matthews Texas 

Mary Eva Martin Georgia 

Allie Mays Georgia 

Alice Miller Georgia 

103 



BEEN A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Alice Mitchell Alabama 

Gladys Moore Georgia 

Blanche Morris North Carolina 

Katherine McKeown Ohio 

Inez McBride Georgia 

Minnie Lou McNeel Georgia 

Mary Parker Georgia 

Emily Power Georgia 

Alma Rentz Alabama 

Lucile Reed Mississippi 

Nellamina Roach Isle of Pines 

Camille Rogers Mississippi 

Ethel Simmons Georgia 

Bessie Shepard Florida 

Helen Shropshire Alabama 

Eva Simpson Georgia 

Marion Sullivan Georgia 

Carrie Swayze Mississippi 

Katie Lee Thomason Georgia 

Mary Tiller Georgia 

Maud Tooke Louisiana 

Viola Whitlock Florida 

Harriet Whyte Florida 

Eugenia Wilkinson Alabama 

Lillian Wilkes Georgia 

Myrtice Wilson Georgia 

Josephine Williford Georgia 

Flora Yow Georgia 

Grace Yow Georgia 

CONSERVATORY IRREGULARS. 

Helen Alston Georgia 

Willie Belle Anthony Georgia 

Marion Bailey Georgia 

Lucille Biggs Missouri 

Grace Braselton Georgia 

lone Carter Florida 

Anna Clarkston South Carolina 

Florence Cobb Georgia 

Agnes Cole Virginia 

Ethel Conner Georgia 

Claire Cozart Georgia 

Beatrice Craig Missouri 

Aurie Will Darnell Georgia 

Nell Dimon Georgia 

Grace Deen Florida 

Ella Downing Alabama 

104 



BEEN A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Lillian Downing Alabama 

Mary DuPre South Carolina 

Anna Dyer Georgia 

Anna Gerth Wisconsin 

Emma Kate Griffin Georgia 

Hortelle Hood Georgia 

Marion Harrell Georgia 

Pauline Harrell Georgia 

Grace Lee Florida 

Katherine Lewis Alabama 

Katherine Lumpkin (A.B., 1915) South Carolina 

Deveaux Money Mississippi 

Dorothy McKeown Ohio 

Katherine McLaughlin North Carolina 

Annette McLean Georgia 

Bonnie Orr North Carolina 

Ruby Rivers Georgia 

Elizabeth Raglan (A.B. Wesleyan College) Georgia 

Frances Schuessler Tennessee 

Ava Takeda (A.B., 1914) Tokyo, Japao 

Ethel Waite Florida 

Sarah Walker Alabama 

Sadie Whitlock Florida 

Mrs. D. I. Whitlock Florida 

Mrs. Palestine Wright Florida 

UNCLASSIFIED NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

Sarah Adams Georgia 

Estelle Boggs Georgia 

Marjorie Busha Georgia 

Durward Craig Georgia 

Mrs. Margaret Carlisle Georgia 

Lottie Belle Crow Georgia 

Coline Darby Georgia 

Mrs. Delaperriere Georgia 

Kathleen Gaines Georgia 

Joe B. George Georgia 

Frieda Gunther Georgia 

Virgil Hardin Georgia 

Haywood Hosch Georgia 

Milton Jackson Georgia 

Walton Jackson Georgia 

Jamie Jones Georgia 

Louise Law Georgia 

Helen Dortch Longstreet (A.B., 1884) 

Cora Eugenia Martin Georgia 

Mildred Mealor Georgia 

105 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Mrs. E. M. Montgomery Georgia 

Maymie Miller Georgia 

Mrs. D. I. Mulkey South Carolina 

Myrtle Craig Ninninger Georgia 

Mary Palmour Georgia 

Elizabeth Parker Georgia 

Clifford Porter Georgia 

Mary Lalla Porter Georgia 

John Redwine Georgia 

Katherine Redwine Georgia 

Rebie Reynolds Georgia 

Leslie Robinson Georgia 

Helen Sanders Georgia 

Armantine Sanders Georgia 

Mrs. W. Smith Georgia 

Mrs. W. C. Smth Georgia 

J. H. Tabor Georgia 

Marie Terrell Georgia 

Helen White Georgia 

Annie Williamson Georgia 

SUMMARY BY CLASSES. 

IN THE COLLEGE. 

Seniors 19 

Juniors 1? 

Sophomores 35 

Freshmen 78 

Irregulars 46 

Specials 4 

IN THE CONSERVATORY. 

Graduates 3 

Seniors 10 

Juniors -^ s 

Sophomores 4S 

Freshmen 47 

Irregulars 41 

Unclassified non-resident students 40 

409 
Names repeated 34 

375 

Summer School 75 

During academic year 450 

106 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

SUMMARY BY STATES.* 

Alabama 43 

Arkansas 1 

Florida 25 

Georgia 201 

Illinois 4 

Indiana 3 

Iowa 2 

Kentucky 7 

Louisiana 2 

Massachusetts 1 

Michigan 1 

Mississippi 21 

Missouri 3 

North Carolina 8 

New Mexico 1 

New York 2 

Ohio 6 

Pennsylvania 2 

South Dakota 1 

South Carolina 19 

Tennessee 6 

Texas 7 

Virginia 4 

West Virginia 1 

Wisconsin 2 

Isle of Pines 1 

Japan 1 

375 

*Summary by states does not include students in Summer School. 



107 



BRE N All COLLEGE BULLE T 1 A 



.STUDENT OFFICERS 



THE STUDENTS' UNION. 

Anna Lea Harbison President 

Louise Williams Vice-President 

Lucile Cox Secretary 

Rena Meek Treasurer 

THE STUDENT COUNCIL. 

Mary Cantrell President 

Rena Meek Vice-President 

Wilhelmina Barrick Secretary-Treasurer 

THE HONOR BOARD. 

Lee Cheney President 

Lula Belle Ellis Vice-President 

Lucile Cox Secretary 

Claire Sheppard Treasurer 

THE PHILOMATHESIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Neta Stuckey President 

Dorothy Ford Vice-President 

Pauline Veatch Secretary 

Jessie Bounds Treasurer 

THE EUZELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Irene Macy President 

Rena Meek Vice-President 

Louise Carson . Secretary 

Grace Huggins Treasurer 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Lee Cheney President 

Martha Groover Vice-President 

Vivian Alexander Secretary 

Dorothy Ford Treasurer 

THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Marian Sutherland President 

Lee Cheney Vice-President 

Grace Huggins Secretary and Treasurer 

108 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 



THE PAN-HELLENIC BOARD. 

Lee Cheney President 

Vivian Alexander Vice-President 

Grace Musser Secretary 

Lucile Cox Treasurer 

THE ORPHEUS CLUB. 

Ruby McGaughey President 

Eleanor Boeschenstein First Vice-President 

Lula Belle Ellis Second Vice-President 

Mary Moss Secretary-Treasurer 

THE CUSHMAN DRAMATIC CLUB. 

Alberta Wright President 

Amy Childs Vice-President 

Anna Lea Harbison Secretary-Treasurer 

THE GLEE CLUB. 

Lula Belle Ellis President 

Nell Dimon Vice-President 

Eleanor Boeschenstein Secretary 

Irene McCarthy Business Manager 

CLASS PRESIDENTS. 

Jessie Bounds , Senior 

Mary Andrews Junior 

Lucile Cox Sophomore 

Helen Crandall Freshman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS. 
Bubbles (Annual.) 

Dorothy Ford Editor 

Mary Andrews Assistant Editor 

Nell Dimon ) Literary Editors 

Marcia Stewart ) 9 

Mattie Lou Lockwood Art Editor 

Elsie Smith Assistant Editor 

Rose Johnson ) Business Managers 

Vivian Alexander j 

Brenatj Journal (Monthly) 

Pauline Veatch Editor 

109 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Laura Brown Assistant Editor 

Harriet Thompson Local Editor 

Eloise Thomas ) _. . _,,., 

Nannie Lou Stevens . . . . \ Exchange Editors 

Ruth Belk ) Business Managers 

Lucile Cox j 

The Alchemist (Weekly). 

Wilhelmina Bar rick ) t^j,-* 

Martha Groover [ EdUor * 

Agnes Conoly Business Manager 

Pearl Floyd Local Editor 

Grace Huggins Athletic Editor 

Dorothy Ford Circulaton Manager 

Ruby McGaughey Alumnae Editor 

HONORARY SOCIETIES 

Phi Beta Sigma (The College). 

Mary Jewell President 

Zeta Phi Eta (The School of Oratory). 

Louise Williams Archon 

Mr Phi Epsilon (Music). 
Irene McCarthy President 



110 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLET IS 



ALUMNAE OF THE COLLEGE 



CLASS OF 1879. 

Carrie R. Cocroft (Mrs. E. B. Thompson) Thomasville, Ga. 

*N. S. Davant (Mrs. R. H. Kennebrew) Greene County, Ga. 

*Mamie S. Mason (Mrs. J. Stanton) Winder, Ga. 

Rowena Reynolds (Mrs. J. H. Heron) Dalton, Ga. 

Zippora Wells (Mrs. James Phillips) Lithonia, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1880. 

*Lula Brown (Mrs. Jim Evans) Gainesville, Ga. 

Hettie L. Clark (Mrs. H. Thompson) Gainesville, Ga. 

Allie R. Lyon (Mrs. J. L. Kennedy) Barnesville, Ga. 

W. D. Whitehurst (Mrs. Dr. Bidger) Perry, Ga. 

Em. C. Wilkes (Mrs. Dr McDaniel) Norcross, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1881. 

Lilly Quinn (Mrs. N. G. Barksdale) Augusta, Ga. 

Lizzie H. Speer (Mrs. E. H. Williams) Juliet, Ga. 

Emma J. Thompson (Mrs. W. D. Welchel) Gainesville, Ga. 

Josie Wilkes (Mrs. S. K. Dendy) Seneca, S. C. 

*Cora Wood (Mrs. John Jones) Atlanta, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1882. 

*Genie Candler (Mrs. Lee Wardroper) Atlanta, Ga. 

Fannie Green (Mrs. F. M. Gay) Eufaula, Ala. 

Mrs. J. H. Hunt Gainesville, Ga. 

*Hattie Kilpatrick (Mrs. W. D. Howell) White Plains, Ga. 

Van Mitchell Butler, Ga. 

Ida Quinn (Mrs. W. S. Swinson) Savannah, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1883. 

*Belle Cape (Mrs. J. Burrell) Lula, Ga. 

S. C. McLendon (Mrs. J. R Tyler) Waynesboro, Ga. 

M. Harris Reeves (Mrs. F. A. Cantrell) Calhoun, Ga. 

Fannie Robertson (Mrs. James Mayson) Atlanta, Ga. 

Nettie Robertson (Mrs. E. Davis) Dallas, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1884. 

Helen Dortch (Mrs. Jas. G. Longstreet) Gainesville, Ga. 

Fannie Joe High (Mrs. Elkins) Locust Grove, Ga. 

Ida Oliver Damn, Ga. 



*Deceased. 

Ill 



B RE N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

L. Electra Tyler (Mrs. Charles DeLoach) Georgetown, Ga. 

Lucy Wallace (Mrs. L. A. Rushing) Millen, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1885. 

Flora Barton (Mrs. W. Dobbs) Monroe, Ga. 

Flora Brooks (Mrs. Dr. Carnog) Lavonia, Ga. 

Nannie Burton (Mrs. A. Cook) Atlanta, Ga. 

Eva Clarke (Mrs. Lee Thompson) Little Rock, Ark. 

Mamie Cox (Mrs. P. C. Langston) Gainesville, Ga. 

Mattie Hill (Mrs. Walter Crumbley) Georgetown, Ga. 

Amanda Jones (Mrs. T. McMullen) Hartwell, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1886. 

In March, 1886, Dr. Wilkes, then President of the Seminary, died. No 
diplomas were awarded at the close of that scholastic year. 

CLASS OF 1887. 

Maud Chapman Dahlonega, Ga. 

Addie O. Rucker (Mrs. H. B. Tingley) New York, N. Y. 

Marie Lou White Gainesville, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1888. 

Sallie Clarke (Mrs. E. Hilton) Hilton, Ga. 

Annie Hay good (Mrs. Dr. Bingham) Jefferson, Ga. 

*Birdie Lilly (Mrs. J. A. Young) Gainesville, Ga. 

Annie Lilly (Mrs. J. O. Carmichael) Atlanta, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1889. 

Blanche Boone (Mrs. C. D. Evans) Bessemer, Ala. 

Maggie Dunlap (Mrs. P. E. B. Robertson) Gainesville, Ga. 

Alice Nance (Mrs. Fred Pfeffer) Mankato, Minn. 

CLASS OF 1890. 

Fannie Adderhold (Mrs. J. C. Fricks) Carnesville, Ga. 

*Lizzie Anderson (Mrs. D. Sipp) 

Bertie Boyd (Mrs. Strube McConnell) Atlanta, Ga. 

Maud Boone Atlanta, Ga. 

Dora Carson (Mrs. Dora Deadwyler) Commerce, Ga. 

Annie Dorsey (Mrs. Isaac L. Harris) Havana, Cuba 

Florence Hines (Mrs. Geo. Brinson) Stillmore, Ga. 

Kate Smith (Mrs. Henry Walton) St. Louis, Mo. 

Nina Smith Gainesville, Ga. 

Nellie White (Mrs. Pratt) Gainesville, Ga. 



*Deceased. 

112 



B RE X A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 



CLASS OF 1891. 

Gussie Appleby (Mrs. A. D. White) Gainesville, Ga. 

Cora Bryan (Mrs. Robert Tomlinson) Sagertown, Texas 

Nellie Dobbs (Mrs. W. F. Love) Atlanta, Ga. 

Maud Dorsey (Mrs. J. D. Woodside) Greenville, S. C. 

*Bessie Gilmore (Mrs. John G. Harrison) Macon, Ga. 

Elia Hobbs Abilene, Texas 

Anna Hudson (Mrs. E. P. Alsobrook) Atlanta, Ga. 

Annie Lou Illges Montgomery, Ala. 

Clara Kicklighter (Mrs. Dr. Rivers) Little Rock, Ark. 

Mattie Kicklighter (Mrs. Sam Bradford) Atlanta, Ga. 

*Lillie McElroy Seneca, S. C. 

Delia Neal Commerce, Ga. 

Estelle Stokes (Mrs. Epps Brown) Atlanta, Ga. 

Marion Weaver (Mrs. Sanders Faust) Lexington, Ga. 

Susie Wallace Gainesville, Ga. 

Lillie Whitehead (Mrs. William J. Herrin) Winder, Ga. 

Myrtle Yow (Mrs. Jefferson Davis) Toccoa, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1892. 

Claud Carson (Mrs. George Rice) Commerce, Ga. 

Madge Couch (Mrs. J. T. Elder) Atlanta, Ga. 

Annie Evans (Mrs. A. D. McCurry) Winder, Ga. 

Pauline Foster (Mrs. M. E. Ballard) Madison, Ga. 

Ella Huff Columbus, Ga. 

Lizzie Keese (Mrs. J. M. Chandler) Sumter, S. C. 

Wortie Montgomery Gainesville, Ga. 

*Lucy Moss Palmetto, Ga. 

Maggie Mealor (Mrs. Harvey Newman) Gainesville, Ga. 

Ella Neal (Mrs. Ben Stovall) Elberton, Ga. 

*Willie Quinn (Mrs. L. E. Green) Danielsville, Ga. 

*Dora Watkins Evinston, Fla. 

CLASS OF 1893. 

*Clara Brooks Gainesville, Ga. 

Irene Carter (Mrs. S. E. Stephens) Pingto, China 

Mattie Campbell (Mrs. Charles West) Savannah, Ga. 

Kate Dozier Gainesville, Ga. 

Lucile Ham (Mrs. A. C. Bridgman) Columbia, S. C. 

Lillian Ham (Mrs. R. W. Hughes) Little Rock. Ark. 

Bessie Hines (Mrs. T. Bagby Ellis) Macon, Ga. 

Mattie McDonald (Mrs. J. O. Perry) Newton, Ga. 

Daisy Moreno Palo Alto, Cal. 

Cora Neal Commerce, Ga. 



^Deceased. 

113 



B RE N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Laura Miller (Mrs. Thomas Morgan) Rockmart, Ga. 

*Trumie Redding (Mrs. Hartford Green) Zebulon, Ga. 

Estelle Sims (Mrs. C. O. Brown) ... Charlotte, N. C. 

Boyce Suddah (Mrs. M. Garrison) Gillsville, Ga. 

Hattie Suddath (Mrs. Bartow Wing) Roswell, Ga. 

Sallie White (Mrs. Dunson) LaGrange, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1894. 

Alice Barnes (Mrs. Hayne Palmour) Gainesville, Ga. 

*Amanda Bedgood Arabi, Ga. 

Mattie Bedgood (Mrs. J. L. Greer) Hanlo, Fla. 

Pauline Cantrell (Mrs. Miller Brady) Los Angeles, Cal. 

Sallie Dickson (Mrs. Sam Wilson) Atlanta, Ga. 

Ella Dickson Jefferson, Ga. 

Sue Doble Crawford, Ga. 

Tommie Kimbrough Cautaula, Ga. 

Annie Belle Lynch (Mrs. Turner Berry) Columbus, Ga. 

*Jean Mitchell (Mrs. B. H. Hardy) Barnesville, Ga. 

Eva Pearce Gainesville, Ga. 

Mary Redding (Mrs. F. P. Davant) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Annie Weaver (Mrs. K. P. Carpenter) Lexington, Ga. 

Meta Whitsett (Mrs. Clarence Castellow) Americus, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1895. 

Annie Boone (Mrs. S. B. Winfield) Athens, Ga. 

Daisy Brooks Lavonia, Ga. 

Bertha Brinson Millen, Ga. 

Fleda Canning Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Mamie Castellow Georgetown, Ga. 

Idelle Candler (Mrs. Mark Palmour) Atlanta, Ga. 

Clemmie Carter Furman, Ala. 

Pearl Dickson (Mrs. J. D. McGuire) Wharton, Texas 

Carrie Green (Mrs. D. P. White) Gainesville, Ga. 

Eula Hudson Commerce, Ga. 

Rubie Lewis (Mrs. J. F. Stanley) Columbus, Ga. 

Lucy Lilly Atlanta Ga. 

Flora Middlebrooks (Mrs. Raymond Victor Harris) . . . Athens, Ga. 

Lillian McMillan (Mrs. Albert Jordan) Hartsville, S. C. 

Jennie Osborn (Mrs. Hogan) Dexter, Ga. 

Flora Pickett (Mrs. Little) Knoxville, Tenn. 

May Smith (Mrs. C. E. Eubanks) Elko, Ga. 

Belle Whelchel (Mrs. R. E Park) Athens, Ga. 

Miriam Wilson Birmingham, Ala. 

Annie Wood (Mrs. George Lathem) Gainesville, Ga. 

*Deceased. 

114 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Lucile Ham, A.M., (Mrs. A. C. Bridgman) Columbia, S. C 

Mean Mitchell, A.M., (Mrs. B. H. Hardy) Barnesville, Ga. 

Eva Pearce, A.M Gainesville, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1896. 

Lillie Alexander, B.L. (Mrs. E. D. Jackson) Athens, Ga. 

Vannie Almand, B.L. (Mrs. H. C. Spratlin) Elberton, Ga. 

Belle Averitt, A.B Columbus, Ga. 

*May Butts, A.B South Carolina 

Pearl Butts, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

M. D. Campbell, A.B. (Mrs. L. D. Watson) Atlanta, Ga. 

Marian Chambers, A.B. (Mrs. George Wrigley) Greenville, S. C. 

Rilla Dozier, A.B. (Mrs. D. G. Bickers) Athens, Ga. 

Berta Drane (Mrs. J. Dunham) Buena Vista, Ga. 

Claude Fitzpatrick, A.B. (Mrs. W. C. Hendricks) . . . Jeffersonville, Ga. 

Gussie Hines, A.B Macon, Ga. 

Cora Holland, A.B. (Mrs. J. A. Coffer) Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Eula Hosch, A.B. (Mrs. R. Hightower) Chicago, 111. 

Louise Pendergrass, A.B. (Mrs. H. I. Mobley) Jefferson, Ga. 

Mary Rice, A.B Barnesville, Ga. 

Verna Sellers, A.B Mellican, Texas 

Mamie Weaver, A.B Lexington, Ga. 

Minnie Wilson, A.B. (Mrs. Fred Bulch) Paris, Tenn. 

Leila Zorn, A.B Thomaston, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1897. 

Daisy Ambrose A.B. (Mrs. J. R. Berry) Griffin, Ga. 

*Etta Boyd, A.B Blakely, Ga. 

Kate Biggers, A.B. (Mrs. J. C. Wooldridge) Columbus, Ga. 

Vesta Cook, B.L. (Mrs. H. C. Eckles) Shady Dale, Ga. 

Maude Colquitt, A.B Jonesboro, Ga. 

Kate Lou Dudley, B.L. (Mrs. Arthur McKee) Cordele, Ga. 

M?>ry Dunlap, B.L. (Mrs. Byron Mitchell) Gainesville, Ga. 

Lucy Mary Flewellen, A.B Union Springs, Ala. 

Annie Griggs, A.B. (Mrs. Carl Burgess) Atlanta, Ga. 

EsteJJe Hood, A.B Commerce, Ga. 

Lillie McComiell, B.L. (Mrs. C. A. Rudolph) Gainesville, Ga. 

Ida Malone, B.L Rutledge Ga. 

Clyde Pearce, A.B. (Mrs. S. S. Brown) Rochelle, Ga. 

Pearl Phillips (Mrs. A. A. Lockette) Cuthbert, Ga. 

Bonnie K. Reid, B.L. (Mrs. W. T. Heritage) Washington, D. C. 

Ellen Timmons, A.B. (Mrs. A. P. Hunter) Tifton, Ga. 

Effie Williams, A.B Columbus, Ga. 



*Deceased. 

115 



B R E N A V CO L L K O E B V L L E T I N 



CLASS OF 1898 

Rosa Averitt, A.B. (Mrs. J. O. Strickland) Pembroke, Ga. 

Ida L. Chandler, A.B Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Sallie M. Cook, A.B. (Mrs. Forest Boyer) Atlanta, Ga. 

Lillian Henderson Atlanta, Ga. 

Gillian Ivey, A.B. (Mrs. Robert Davis) Tenniile, Ga. 

*Helen Johnson, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Belle Johnson, A.B., (Mrs. H. C. Anderson) Athens, Ga. 

Lottie Moon, A.B., (Mrs. Early Johnson) Columbus, Ga. 

Mittie Porter, A.B Columbus, Ga. 

Mamie Simmons, A.M., (Mrs. O. McDermed) Gainesville, Ga. 

*Mary Wynn, B.L Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Mary Young, A.B. (Mrs. S. A. Youmans) Panama City, Fla. 

CLASS OF 1899 

Donie Adams, B.S., (Mrs. J. H. Rabb) Laurens, S. C. 

Anna Bolton, B.L., (Mrs. T. S. McElreath) Moultrie, Ga. 

Lee Brown, A.B., (Mrs. Aubrey Harper) Wray, Ga. 

Helen Brown, A.B Carrollton, Ga. 

*Mittie Carson, B. L Commerce, Ga. 

Gussie Carson, B.L Commerce, Ga. 

Lizzie Dougherty, A.B., (Mrs. S. M. Brice) Sally, S. C. 

Leila Flewellen, A.B Union Springs, Ala. 

Delia Hood, A.B Commerce, Ga. 

*Susie Hightower (Mrs. P. Walker) Valdosta, Ga. 

Clara Hill, B.L., (Mrs. Otis Lathem) Gainesville, Ga. 

Minnie Kimsey, A.B., (Mrs. Claude Bond) Toccoa, Ga. 

India Miller, A.B. (Mrs. C. T. Brown) Lavonia, Ga. 

Mamie Moore, B.L Groveland, Ga. 

Maud Moore, B. L. (Mrs. Benson) Statesboro, Ga. 

Sadie McConnell, A.B. (Mrs. W. A. Roper) Gainesville, Ga. 

Susie McMichael, A.B. (Mrs. E. H. Johnson) Oxford, Ga. 

Ethel Skinner, B.L. (Mrs. E. H. Pritchett) Camden, Ala. 

Pellie Stevens, A.B Lexington, Ga. 

Fannie Stevens, A.B. (Mrs. P. E. Glenn) Lexington, Ga. 

Bertha Shelley, B.S. (Mrs. Stanley) Griffin, Ga. 

Janie Williams, B.L. (Mrs. P. V. Spier) Furman, Ala. 

Eva Ware, B.L. (Mrs. W. M. Wilder) Albany, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1900. 

Martha Askew, A.B Newnan, Ga. 

Cora Betts, A.B McDonough, Ga. 

Lizzie Boone, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 



*Deceased. 

116 



11RENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Lila Copeland, A.B McDonough, Ga. 

Claudia Culpepper, B.S Fort Valley, Ga. 

Isabel Daniel, A.B. (Mrs. R. S. Smith) Tennille, Ga. 

Caroline Denmark, A.B. (Mrs. Joseph Tillman) Quitman, Ga. 

Ola Evans, A.B Halcyondale, Ga. 

Elizabeth Ficklin, A.B. (Mrs. E. F. Lowe) Ashburn, Ga. 

Ruby Fleming, B.L Atlanta, Ga. 

Annie Hill, B.L. (Mrs. Smith) Taylors, S. C. 

Carolyn Johnson, B.L Birmingham, Ala. 

Clarabel Lord, A.B Tennille, Ga. 

Cora Reed, B.L. (Mrs. Logan) Asheville, N. C. 

Lucile Townsend, A.B. (Mrs. H. J. Pearce) Gainesville, Ga. 

Lizzie Norman, A.B. (Mrs. E. S. Ray) Norwood, Ga. 

Gussie Thomas, A.B. (Mrs. — . — . ) St. Louis, Mo. 

*Enola Turner, B.S Saint's Rest, Miss. 

Minnie L. Van Horn, A.B Monroe, Ga 

CLASS OF 1901. 

Florence Barfield, B.S. (Mrs. — . — . ) Macon, Ga. 

Jessie Butler, A.B. (Mrs. — . . ) Morrow, Ga. 

Kate Clark, A.B. (Mrs. Foster) Greenville, S. C. 

Belle Cordray, B.S. (Mrs. Wade Brunson) Blakely, Ga. 

Lena Evans, A.B. (Mrs. Cary Arnett) Claxton, Ga. 

Jessie Frazer, B.S. (Mrs. Robt. West) Montgomery, Ala. 

Mae Frazer, B.S. (Mrs. L. M. VanDyke) Cleveland, Ohio 

Alice Johnson, B.S. (Mrs. Joe Johnson) Americus, Ga. 

Annie B. Matthews, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Bessie Meek, B.S Washington, D. C. 

Mary Merritt, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Mattie Michael, A.B Monroe, Ga. 

Carrie Moore, B.S. (Mrs. B. B. Sorrier) Groveland, Ga. 

Ella Richardson, A.B. (Mrs. Grady Ballinger) Seneca, S. C 

Esther Stevens, B.L. Lumpkin, Ga 

Verdie Thompson, A.B. (Mrs. R. C. Stephens) ... St. Augustine, Fla. 

Harriet Walton, B.S. (Mrs. Earl Anderson) Danburg, Ga. 

Emma Warnock, B.L, (Mrs. J. C. Pretorious) Arlen, Ga. 

Mattie F. Williams, A.B. (Mrs. A. Kirven) Columbus, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1902. 

Rose Allen, B.O. (Mrs. Chas. Valier) St. Louis, Mo. 

Annie Bell, B.O Waynesboro, Ga. 

Estelle Blocker, A.B Bluffton, Ga. 

C. Chambers, A.B. (Mrs. A. M. DuPree) Spartanburg, S. C 

Ethel Childs (Mrs. B. L. Brown) Coleman, Ga. 



* Deceased. 

117 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Josephine Denmark, A.B Valdosta, Ga. 

Georgia Dixon, A.B. (Mrs. James Dunlap) Birmingham, Ala. 

Bessie Gaines, B.L. (Mrs. — . — . Laing) Calhoun, Ga. 

H. Gottheimer, A.B. (Mrs. H. McWhorter) Lexington, Ga. 

Nettie Gray, A.B Locust Grove, Ga. 

Margaret Hair, B.S. (Mrs. H. D. Sill, Jr.) Blackville, S. C. 

Ora Hewitt, B.S Sasser, Ga. 

Lillie Jones, B.O. (Mrs. Smith) Jellico, Tenn. 

*Marie Milhous, B.L. (Mrs. H. B. Hair) Blackville, S. C. 

Frankie Norman, B.D. (Mrs. B. B. McDonald) Conyers, Ga. 

Kate Parker, A.B. (Mrs. H. C. Cone) Statesboro, Ga. 

Lula Payne, A.B. (Mrs. M. McWhorter) Fort Lamar, Ga. 

Susie Spence, A.B Camilla, Ga. 

Clyde Stansell, B.L Elko, S. C. 

Kate Trout, B.L. (Mrs. E. A. Caldwell) Monroe, Ga. 

Lessie Weaver, A.B. (Mrs. F. C. Reed) Lexington, Ga. 

Una Webb, B.L. (Mrs. John Oats) Charlotte, N. C 

CLASS OF 1903. 

Ruth Baker, A.B Owensboro, Ky. 

Gertie Blalock, A.B Jonesboro, Ga. 

Nell Bright, (Mrs. Edmund Wroe) Louisville, Ky. 

Eliza Bright, A.B. (Mrs. O. W. Davison) Athens, Ga. 

Bonnie Brock, A.B Jefferson, Ga. 

Mabel Brown, B.S. (Mrs. H. R. Sherard) Williamston, S. C 

Johnnie Burnett, B.L. (Mrs. Collis Bishop) El Paso, Texas 

Lucile Canning, A.B Chickasha, Okla. 

Florrie Carter, B.L Gainesville, Ga. 

Pearl Coffin, B.L. (Mrs. A. G. Fort) Atlanta, Ga. 

Annie Lou Copeland, B.L. (Mrs. Alden Combs) .... Barnesville, Ga. 

Eddie Dickson, A.B. (Mrs. C. T. Storey, Jr.) Jefferson, Ga. 

Sarah Gunn, A.B. (Mrs. J. C. Thomas) Adel, Ga. 

Julia B. McLeod, B.L. (Mrs. George B. Morgan) Vienna, Ga. 

Anna McConnell, A.B., B.O., (Mrs. S. Gayle Riley) . . . Gainesville, Ga. 

Hessie Newton, A.B Oliver, Ga. 

Pauline Smith, A.B Oliver, Ga. 

Madeline Rampley, B.S. (Mrs. L. N. McWhorter) .... Royston, Ga. 

Obie Stevens, B.L. (Mrs. Walter Faust) Lexington, Ga. 

Rachel Tomlinson, B.O. (Mrs. — . — . ) Kentucky 

CLASS OF 1904. 
Lavada Arnold, A.B. (Mrs. William M. Holsenbeck) .... Winder, Ga. 

Henry Emma Blalock, A.B Jonesboro, Ga. 

*Mary Augusta Boone, B.L. (Mrs. W. W. Blackwell) . Waynesville, N. C. 
Rusha Brazell, B.S English Eddy, Ga. 



*Deceased. 

118 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLE TJ \ 



*Martha Lucy Brown, B.L. (Mrs. T. H. Parham) . . . McDonough, Ga. 

Hettie Carson, A.B Commerce, Ga. 

Lucile Canning, A.M Chickasha, Okla. 

Clara Dale, A.B. (Mrs. Robt. Black) Commerce, Ga. 

Ethel F. Hardage, B.L Powder Springs, Ga. 

Nann Louise Killian, B.L Waynesville, N. C. 

Louise E. Lott, A.B. (Mrs. J. R. McMichael) Buena Vista, Ga. 

Mattie Cole Morton, B.L. (Mrs. — . — . ) .... Lumpkin, Ga. 

Hattie Oberry, B.L. (Mrs. b. O. Quillian) ...... Willacoochee, Ga. 

Clara Clifford Parker, B.L MiUen, Ga. 

Massie Lee Paschal, A.B. (Mrs. Asa Marshall) ...... Baconton, Ga. 

Ana F. Perry, A.B. (Mrs. A. R. Baggs) Pelham, Ga. 

Mary Clara Price, B.L Utica, Miss. 

May Bess Scott, B.L. (Mrs. John P. Turk) Nelson, Ga. 

Mamie Alice Smith, B.L. (Mrs. B. H. Groover) Reidsville, Ga. 

Emily Toy Spence, B.L Camilla, Ga. 

Jeannie C. Ware, A.B. (Mrs. Ross McConnell) Gainesville, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1905. 

Blossom Adamson, A.B Rome, Ga. 

Willie Bowden, B.L. (Mrs. B. H. Parham) Stinson, Ga. 

Clarice Brooks, A.B Molena, Ga. 

Sara Brazell, A.B. (Mrs. E. L. Meadow) Vidalia, Ga. 

Anna Battle, B.S. (Mrs. C. C. Walker) Atlanta, Ga. 

Ida M. Blocker, B.L. (Mrs. V. V. Bailey) Blakely, Ga. 

Bessie Mel Bickers, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Frances Carson, A.B Commerce, Ga. 

Willie Carson, A.B Commerce, Ga. 

Esther Gottheimer, B.L. (Mrs. Geo. Barron) Lexington, Ga. 

* Jessie Henry, B.L. (Mrs. — . — . ) .... Orangeburg, S. C. 

Ella M. Hargrove, A.B. (Mrs. Coxe) South Carolina 

Lonnie Mitchell, B.L. (Mrs. T. E. Day) Gainesville, Ga. 

Volina Mitchell, B.L. (Mrs. Clark Knight) Tampa, Fla. 

Ruby Mansfield, B.L. (Mrs. Boyd Ashley Wise) Bluffton, Ga. 

Bessie Morris, B.L Ft. Gaines, Ga. 

Kate Norman, B.S. (Mrs. Melvin Turner) Douglas, Ga. 

Elizabeth Quillian, A.B Hucking, Ga. 

Maude Smith, A.B Reidsville, Ga. 

Clara May Smith, B.L. (Mrs. J. V. Varnadoe) Screven, Ga. 

Mary Wartman, B. L. (Mrs. E. H. Cox) Atlanta, Ga. 

Willie J. Wimberly, B.L Waynesboro, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1906. 

Georgia Arnall, B.L., B.O. in 1907 (Mrs. B. D. Porter) . Jefferson, Ga. 
Lucy Buchanan, B.L. (Mrs. Carter Cole) Atlanta, Ga. 

^Deceased. 

119 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULL E T I N 

Ola Bell, A.B. (Mrs. J. I. McLaughlin) Greenville, Ga. 

Flora Blalock, B.L Jonesboro, Ga. 

Mary Reynolds Carter, A.B. (Mrs. Rogers Winter) .... Atlanta, Ga. 

Robbie Carter, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

*Pauline Hardaman, B.L Monroe, Ga. 

Mattie Sue Ham, A.B Jackson, Ga. 

May Hutchinson, B.L. (Mrs. Marvin Maynard) Athens, Ga. 

Corinne Mansfield, A.B. (Mrs. Jackson Davis) Richmond, Va. 

Clara McKinney, B.L. (Mrs. Gus Edwards) Clarksville, Ga. 

Edna Cherry, B.L. (Mrs. J. F. Ward) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Lamar Puckett, B.L Cartersville, Ga. 

Esther Smith B.L Locust Grove, Ga. 

Mary T. Smith, B.L. (Mrs. C. Smathers) Waynesville, N. C. 

Fay Twitty, A.B. (Mrs. James S. White) Gainesville, Ga. 

Ethel Thompson, A.B McHenry, Ga. 

Emma Whelchel, A.B. (Mrs. Ben Gaillard) Gainesville, Ga. 

Gertrude Williams, B.L Gainesville, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1907. 

Ola Bell, B.O. (Mrs. J. I. McLaughlin) Greenville, Ga. 

Lucy Burton, A.B Jasper, Ala. 

Janie Chandler, B.L Waynesboro, Ga. 

Marguerite Chaffee, B.L., B.O Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Sadie Ginsberg B.S Mossy Head, Fla. 

Constance Hall, B.L. B.O. in 1908 (Mrs. N. B. Layman) . DuQuoin, 111. 
Louise Ivey, B.L. (Mrs. W. M. Whitehurst) .... Jeffersonville, Ga. 

Lalla Jordan, B.O Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bertha Mathews, B.L. (Mrs. J. H. Woodall) Woodland, Ga. 

Ida Manning, B.L Gainesville, Ga. 

Volina Mitchell, B.O. (Mrs. Clarke Knight) Tampa, Fla. 

Julia Oliver, B.L Miami, Fla. 

Olive Patton, B.L Franklin, N. C. 

Telete Scott, B.L Canton, Ga. 

Lourette Simms, B.L. (Mrs. W. Y. Atkinson, Jr.) Newnan, Ga. 

Julia Smith, B.L. (Mrs. M. C. Brown) Lake Park, Ga. 

Estora Timmons, B.L., B.O. (Mrs. Frank Scarboro) .... Tifton, Ga. 

Kate Thompson, A.B. (Mrs. John W. Williams) Madison, Ga 

Lula Warnock, L.I Brooklet, Ga. 

Lillie White, B.O. (Mrs. Wm. Owens) Atlanta, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1908. 

Martha Elizabeth Alexander, B.O Athens, Ga. 

Maude Alexander, B.L Brooksville, Fla. 

Lorena Aderhold, B.L Gainesville, Ga. 



•Deceased. 

120 



B RE N A U COLLEGE BULLET I S 

Virginia Blocker, A.B Bluffton, Ga. 

Annie Byers, B.L. (Mrs. A. T. Winters) New Holland, Ga. 

Christine Berrong, L.I. (Mrs. Kimsey) Clarkesville, Ga. 

Gladys Crawford, L.I. (Mrs. R. F. Brooks) Lexington, Ga. 

Charlotte Atwater DeVine, B.O New Haven, Conn. 

Mattie Dupree, B.L Zebulon, Ga. 

Evelyn Duffey, A.B Jonesboro, Ga. 

Kathleen Evans, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Wynona Evans, B.L Plains, Ga. 

Allie Hays, B.O. (Mrs. N. Richardson) Toccoa, Ga. 

Indie Harrell, A.B Madison, Ga. 

Elizabeth Hudgins, B.L. (Mrs. Palmer Simpson, Jr.) .... Toccoa, Ga. 

Ida Mae Kilgore, L.I Winder, Ga. 

Fay Logan, A.B., B.O. in 1909 Atlanta, Ga. 

Lilian Maxwell, L.I Lexington, Ga. 

Mary Louise Nicholson, A.B Collinsville, Ala. 

Belle Nowell, A.B. (Mrs. A. B. Stevens) Jacksonville, Fla. 

Fleta Nesbit, B.L Irwinton, Ga. 

Florence Pope, A.B Benton, 111. 

Fannie Lou Patillo, B.L. (Mrs. J. R. Burton) Buford, Ga. 

Mary Ella Perry, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Sara Lee Baker, B.O Owens boro, Ky. 

Clara Bell, A.B. (Mrs. Edwn Davis) Decatur, Ga. 

Florence Reville, B.L. (Mrs. W. B. Gibbs) Folkston, Ga. 

Winnie D. Rowe, A.B Buford, Ga. 

Ruby Rowland, B.L Crawford, Ga. 

Nelle Ramseur, B.D. (Mrs. L. E. Morton) Boston, Ga. 

Mary Thomas, B.L New York, N. Y. 

Mary Lucy Turner, A.B., B.O Atlanta, Ga. 

*Lecie Wells, A.B Cornelia, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1909. 

Geno Aiken, B.A Benton, 111. 

Martha Elizabeth Alexander, B.L Athens, Ga. 

Maybird, Burt, B.A Buena Vista, Ga. 

Laura Brown, L.I Royston, Ga 

Rowena Burks, B.O Pauls Valley, Okla. 

Mary Elmore Benton, B.L Seale, Ala. 

Carrie Lee Coombs, B.A Locust Grove, Ga. 

Elsie Davison, B.A Comer, Ga. 

Sourie VanHoose Glover, B.S Macon, Ga. 

Julia Gilbert Jones, A.B. (Mrs. Julian Calhoun) . . Spartanburg, S. C 

Bessie Milner L.I Gulfport, Miss. 

Mary Dean Owen, B.A Gainesvile, Ga. 

Lita Lucia Pierce, B.A Lake Charles, La. 

* Deceased. 

121 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Corinne Parrent, B.L Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Anna Moselle Quillian, L.I Maxeys, Ga. 

Elsie Ragan, B.A Hawkins ville, Ga. 

Malda Fredonia Shepherd, B.A Tifton, Ga. 

Susie Louise Strickland, B.A Duluth, Ga. 

Josephine Schneider, B.A. B.O. in 1910 (Mrs. Bennett Land, Jr. 

Plant City, Fla. 

Eloise Smith, B.A Greensboro, Ga. 

Mary Willard Starke, B.L Rockmart, Ga. 

Ruby Sealy, B.L Moye, Ga. 

Ida Thompson, B.L. (Mrs. G. E. Stock) Montgomery, Ala. 

CLASS OF 1910 

Norma Allen, A.B LaFayette, Ala. 

Frances Arnold, B.L Hampton, Ga. 

Sadye Andrews, B.O. (Mrs. Harry H. Johnson) Atlanta, Ga. 

Dovie Bryans, A.B Jackson, Ga. 

Laura Belle Broeker, B.L Owensboro, Ky. 

Isabelle Charters, A.B. (Mrs. Sidney Smith) Gainesvile, Ga. 

Eva Jessie Dickey, B.L. (Mrs. J. H. McCay) . . . Mineral Bluff, Ga. 

Mae Frank Duffey, A.B. (Mrs. — . — . ) .... Atlanta, Ga. 

Mary Edwards, B.O Eastman, Ga. 

Julia Fuller, B.L Birmingham, Ala. 

Alma Glenn, A.B. (Mrs. — . — . ) Atlanta, Ga. 

Bye Hill, B.L. (Mrs. .) Gulf port, Miss. 

Leslie Harrell, B.O. (Mrs. R. E. Snow) Quitman, Ga. 

Clara Head, B.L Gainesville, Ga. 

Willie Ivey, L.I Tennille, Ga. 

Marie Locke, A.B Eufaula, Ala. 

Myrtle Mobley, A.B. (Mrs. J. W. Combs) Monticello, Ga. 

Mattie Manning, L.I Gainesvile, Ga. 

Jessie M. Peterson, A.B Ailey, Ga. 

Desma Pentecost, B.O. (Mrs. Edgar D. Kenyon) .... Gainesville, Ga. 

Faye Simmons, A.B. (Mrs. John Woodcock) Gainesville, Ga. 

Dessie Suddath, A.B. (Mrs. R. McG. Marbury) Buford, Ga. 

Ruth Stone, B.O Linton, Ga. 

Nettie Thompson, B.L Pendleton, S. C. 

Effie Waters, B.L Gainesville, Ga. 

Louise Wright, B.O Norfolk, Va 

CLASS OF 1911. 

Starr Elizabeth Blasingame, A.B., (Mrs. H. A. Carithers) . Winder, Ga. 

Myrtis Beach, B.L Waycross, Ga. 

*Kate Durand Bogart, Dom. Sc. (Mrs. H. R. Mahoney) . Fernandina, Fla. 



*Deceased. 

122 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Annie May Christie, A.B Decatur, Ga. 

Janet Hayden Christian, A.B Elberton, Ga. 

Helen Louise Craig, Dom. Sc Mattoon, 111. 

Anna Cornelia Cheney, B.L. Mrs. Jeff Pipkin) Shellman, Ga. 

Agnes Duffey, A.B Morrow, Ga. 

Nana Beall Dent, A.B. (Mrs. Geo. McGough) Eufaula, Ala. 

Catherine Allen Dent, L.I Eufaula, Ala. 

Mary Clyde Douglas, B.L. (Mrs. John McDaniel Duluth, Ga. 

Stella Belle Douglas, B.L Norcross, Ga. 

Frances Isabel Evans, B.L Montgomery, Ala. 

Kathleen Adelaide Evans, B.L. (Mrs. Elliott S. Armistead) 

Montgomery, Ala. 

Sally Waddell Evans, B.L Montgomery, Ala. 

Lucy Agnes Finger, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

*Annie Kate Gresham, B.L. (Mrs. M. T. Bryson) . . . Bostwick, Ga. 

Ruth Hodges, B.L Americus, Ga. 

Essa Hamilton (Mrs. E. F. Powell) Vienna, Ga. 

Jennie May Hood, B.L. (Mrs. Julian Herndon) .... Leesburg, Fla. 

Grace Lumpkin, Dom. Sc Killian, S. C. 

Terese Hunter Merrill, B.L Eufaula, Ala. 

Addie Louise Noell, A.B Winterville, Ga. 

Aline Palmour, A.B. (Mrs. — . — . ) .... Adairsviile, Ga. 

Helen Pope, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Clara Parker, B.L. (Mrs. Benjamin Sullivan) Atlanta, Ga. 

Cecil Schaefer Ramsay, A.B., Dom. Sc Greenville, S. C. 

Minnie Lillian Rogers, A.B., (Mrs. Harry C. Hawkins) . . . Baxley, Ga. 

Sadie Scales Robinson, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Eugenia Weems Redd, B.O. (Mrs. Mark Bradford) . . . Columbus, Ga. 

Lucy Roberts, B.O Lavonia, Ga. 

Myrtle Rushin, L.I Buena Vista, Ga. 

Margaret Smith, L.I Murphy, N. C. 

Susie Smith, Dom. Sc. (Mrs. J. D. Collins) Gainesville, Ga. 

Emma Lillian Thompson, A.B Calhoun, Ga. 

Wilma Twitty, B.L Pelham, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1912. 

Carrie May Brinson, A.B Stillmore, Ga. 

Alberta Baldwin, A.B. (Mrs. J. R. Stokes) Dawson, Ga. 

Edna May Boyd, A.B Cleveland, Ga. 

Hattie Bell Bass, B.L Parrott, Ga. 

Magnolia Bostwick, B.L Bostwick, Ga. 

Ellen Barfield, Dom. Sc. (Mrs. J. Rosco Carrell) .... Pinehurst, Ga. 
Lessie Lillian Covington, A.B. (Mrs. A. M. Secrest) .... Monroe, N. C. 
Leta Coleman, B.L., B.O., A.M. in 1914 (Mrs. Wm, Hosch) Gainesville, Ga. 
Carol Chase Dean, A.B. (Mrs. Frank Spratling) .... Atlanta, Ga. 



*Deceased. 

128 



B R \E N A U COLLEGE BU LLET1 N 

Allie Lou Evans, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Ruth Elgin, B.L Meridian, Miss. 

Erin Holder, A.B. (Mrs. — . — . ) Jefferson, Ga. 

Octavia Hunter, B.L Shreveport, La. 

Lenore Jones, B.L Ft. Davis, Texas 

Phoebe Josephine Laing, A.B. (Mrs. E. B. Mosley) . Birmingham, Ala. 
Elizabeth McNair, B.L. (Mrs. James D. Ledbetter) . . . Camilla, Ga. 

Kittie Hunter Newton, A.B Madison, Ga. 

Emma Neel Partlow, B.L Kirksey, S. C. 

Irene Holmes Redding, B.L Zebulon, Ga. 

Marie Smith, B.L Dublin, Ga. 

Maude Timmons, B.L Tifton, Ga. 

Margaret Waggoner, Dom. Sc Winterville, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1913. 

Flora Mildred Adkins, B.A Williamsburg, Ky. 

Lula Belle Calhoun, B.L Americus, Ga. 

Nellie Maude Carter, B.A Jasper, Ala. 

Pauline Inez Castleberry, B.A Gainesville, Ga. 

Mamie Cohen, B.O Madison, Ga. 

Frances Elizabeth Gay, B.O Turin, Ga. 

Mary Schroder Hahn, Dom. Sc Aiken, S. C. 

Gladys Wilson Johns, B.A. (Mrs. Jacob Hunter) .... Bamberg, S. C. 

Emeline Finzer Jones, B.L College Park, Ga. 

Her Elizabeth King, B.L Homer, La. 

Jura Frances Kytle, L.I Cleveland, Ga. 

Elma Martha Mathews, L.I. (Mrs. Arthur Smith) . . Gainesville, Ga. 

Estelle Nottingham, B.A Franktown, Va. 

Coralye S. R. Richardson, B.A Montgomery, Ala. 

*Kate Robertson, B.A Gainesville, Ga. 

Bessie May Stovall, L.I. (Mrs. — . — . ) . . Gainesville, Ga. 

Laura McNair Weddell, B.A Tarboro, N. C. 

CLASS OF 1914. 

Mary Blanton, A.B., B.O Zetella, Ga. 

Fay Brown, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Isabel Evans, A.B Montgomery, Ala. 

Laura Harris, A.B Dalton, Ga. 

Octavia Hunter, A.B Shreveport, La. 

Sallie Ivey, A.B Lenoir, N. C. 

Louise Johnson, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Elizabeth Kimbrough, A.B. (Mrs. Lester Hosch) . . . Gainesville, Ga. 

Louise Liddon, A.B Marianna, Fla. 

Sadie Lipscomb, A.B Gaffney, S. C. 



* Deceased. 

124 



B R E N A U COL L EGE B I L L E T I N 

Kathleen Richardson, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Mare Rozier, A.B Opp, Ala. 

Jessie Rulien, B.O Joliet, 111. 

Rose Marie Smith, B.Q Plant City, Fla. 

Cynthia Stevens, A.B Crawford, Ga. 

Aya Takeda, A.B Tokyo, Japan 

Mary Wood, A.B Lumpkin, Ga. 

CLASS OF 1915 

Pansy Aiken, A.B Jefferson, Ga. 

Lucy Bassett, A.B Fort Valley, Ga. 

Carolyn Crawley, B.O Madison, Ga. 

Rita Durden, A.B., B.O Graymont, Ga. 

Jewell Daniel, A.B Pensacola, Fla. 

Fannie Mae Chestnutt, A.B Montgomery, Ale. 

Emily Clark, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Reba Calhoun, A.B Americus, Ga. 

Esther Graydon, A.B Abbeville, S. C. 

Beulah Hall, A.B Ocala, Fla. 

Ethel Harrell, A.B Roanoke, Va. 

Adel Johnson, A.B Gainesville, Ga. 

Jurelle Little, A.B Cordele, Ga. 

Katherine Lumpkin, A.B Columbia, S. C. 

Maggie Marvin, A.B Hendersonville, S. C. 

Rosa Mathews, A.B Prattsburg, Ga. 

Mary G. Smith, A.B Talbotton, Ga. 

Altha Talbot, A.B Lake Charles, La. 

Juanita Tichenor, B.O Chattanooga, Tenn. 



125 



II It E N A V COLLEGE BULLETIN 



ALUMNAE OF THE CONSERVATORY 



Abbreviations: P., Piano; V., Voice; Vi., Violin; O. Organ; A., Art. 

1892. 

Anna Evans (Mrs. A. D. MeCurry) Winder, Ga. 

* Willie Quinn (Mrs. L. E. Greene) Danielsville, Ga. 

Estelle Stokes (Mrs. Epps Brown) Atlanta, Ga. 

1893 

Dora Brinson Forsyth, Ga. 

Madge Couch (Mrs. J. T. Elder) Atlanta, Ga. 

Claude Law Gainesville, Ga. 

Nellie Flanders (Mrs. M. C. Brown) Gainesville, Ga. 

Eva Jones (Mrs. B. R. Beck) Eatonton, Ga. 

1894. 

Sue Aderhold (Mrs. H. Dortch) Carnesville, Ga. 

Alice Barnes (Mrs. Hayne Palmour) Gainesville, Ga. 

Bessie Bell (Mrs. J. D. DuBose) Huguenot, Ga. 

Josie Brinson (Mrs. Dowdy Miller) Millen, Ga. 

Mattie Campbell (Mrs. C. West) Savannah, Ga. 

Elvie Dinkins (Mrs. — . — . -) Troy, Ala. 

Leland Dukes (Mrs. P. Smith) Quitman, Ga. 

May Land (Mrs. Dr. Toole) Macon, Ga. 

Mattie Smith Midway, Ala. 

Eva Smith Midway, Ala. 

*Mattie White (Mrs. C. Walker) Gainesville, Ga. 

1895. 

Bertha Brinson Lawtonville, Ga. 

Carrie Carpenter Nashville, Tenn. 

Marion Chambers (Mrs. Rigley) Greenville, S. C. 

Fannie Gaulding Crawford, Ga. 

Beulah Hall (Mrs. C. R. Jenkins) Macon, Ga. 

Marie Hall Midway, Ala. 

*Hattie Harvie (Mrs. H. H. Clements) Buena Vista, Ga. 

Lucy Lowry (Mrs. Moses Harper) Dawson, Ga. 

Flora Pickett (Mrs. Little) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Daisy Province (Mrs. W. C. Butler) Richmond, Va. 



*Deceased. 

126 



B RE N A U COLLEGE BULLET I N 

1896. 

* Irene Averitt, P. and V Richmond, Va. 

Mamie Castellow, A Georgetown, Ga. 

Sallie Fall, P. (Mrs. Earl V. Ellis) Beckham, Ala. 

Fannie Gaulding, V Lexington, Ga. 

Claud Gibson, P. (Mrs. G. F. Alford) Sylvester, Ga. 

Elia Hobbs, A Gainesville, Ga. 

Lucy Lowry, V. (Mrs. Moses Harper) Dawson, Ga. 

Obelia Lynch, P. (Mrs. W. C. Thompson) Union Springs, Ala. 

Lizette McConnell, P., V. (Mrs. W. Carter) .... Uruguanaya, Brazil 

Lillian McMillan, A. (Mrs. A. Jordan) Allapaha, Ga. 

Delia Smith, P., V Locust Grove, Ga. 

Susie Townsend, P Troy, Ala. 

Sammie Wilson, A. (Mrs. H. Wilson) Houston, Texas 

Clyde Willis, V Hawkinsville, Ga. 

1897. 

Dasy Ambrose, P. (Mrs. J. R. Berry) Griffin, Ga. 

Francis Blackburn, A Pine Level, Ala. 

Sophronia Brannan, A Troy, Ala. 

Elizabeth Car swell, P. (Mrs. Chapman) Jeffersonville, Ga. 

Alma Carroll, A Troy, Ala. 

Lelia Carter, A. (Mrs. E. L. Morgan) Hwang Hien, China 

Cora Cheney, A. (Mrs. Newton Morris) Marietta, Ga. 

Pearl Dickson, P., V. (Mrs. McGuire) Wharton, Texas 

Lizzie Hall, A El Paso, Texas 

Susie Harvey, A Columbus, Ga. 

Rosa Hardaway, P Thomson, Ga. 

Susie Malone, A Troy, Ala. 

Daisy Moreno, P Gainesville, Ga. 

Louise Pendergrass, P. (Mrs. H. I. Mobley) Jefferson, Ga. 

Eula B. Townsend, P. (Mrs. Walter Whatley) Ramer, Ga. 

Callie Watson, P Jefferson, Ga. 

Mary E. West, V. (Mrs. E. W. Summerlin) Willacoochee, Ga. 

1898. 

Edna Dennard, A. (Mrs. Perry) Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Lillie Folmar, V. (Mrs. Clfton Williamson) Montgomery, Ala. 

*Pearl Moore, P Dublin, Texas 

Mittie Payne, A. (Mrs. W. R. Wall) Dawson, Ga. 

Clara Perkins, P. (Mrs. Bargeron) Perkins Junction, Ga. 

Leila Smith, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Bennie Thompson, P. (Mrs. White) Thomaston, Ga. 



* Deceased. 

127 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULL E T J ZV 

1899. 

*Belle Bloodworth, V Alexander City, Ala. 

Anna Booker, P. (Mrs. Stapleton) Colquitt, Ga. 

*Alma Boring, V. (Mrs. Perkinson) Woodstock, Ga. 

Elise Holmes, B.O Atlanta, Ga. 

Lizzie Lumpkin, B.O. (Mrs. E. B. Glenn) Columbia, S. C. 

Ethel Skinner, P. (Mrs. E. H. Pritchett) Camden, Ala. 

Eva Ware, P. (Mrs. W. M. Wilder) Albany, Ga. 

Janie Williams, P. (Mrs. P. V Spier) Furman, Ala. 

Maude Yarborugh, P Hendersonville, N. C. 

1900. 

Glen Adams, P. (Mrs. O. F. Paxson) Abbeville, Ga. 

Boodie Angley, P. (Mrs. Hinds) Abbeville, Ga. 

Carrie Sue Blocker, P Bluffton, Ala. 

Annie R. Caldwell, A. (Mrs. Norman Sayer) ....... Ensley, Ga. 

Juliet Carlton, A. (Mrs. Dr. Fulilove) Athens, Ga. 

Maude Conley, P Ivy Log, Ga. 

Ola Evans, P. Halcyondale, Ga. 

Martha Hudson, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Mary Merritt, A Gainesville, Ga. 

Elizabeth Mills, P. (Mrs. J. M. Kimbrough) Chicago, 111. 

Cora Reid, B.O. (Mrs. Logan) Asheville, N. C. 

Clara M. Smith, P Monroe, Ga. 

Rae Sponcler, P. (Mrs. T. H. Garrett) Augusta, Ga. 

1901 

Mary Gibson, P. (Mrs. Simms) Newnan, Ga. 

Nellie Reeves, P Charleston, S. C 

1902. 

Edna Covington, A. (Mrs. M. E. Covington) Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rosa Few, P. (Mrs. Schank) Hendersonville, N. C. 

Jennie Few, P. (Mrs. Eubanks) Hendersonville, N. C 

Ina Weiss Hartley, P Batesburg, S. C 

Lottie Johns, P Social Circle, Ga. 

Blanche Latta, P. (Mrs. S. C. Parker) Millen, Ga. 

*Marie Millhouse, A. (Mrs. H. B. Hair) Blackwell, S. C. 

May Parlin, P. (Mrs. — . — . ) Carrabelle, Fla. 

Grace Petty, P. (Mrs. — . — . ) Gainesville, Ga, 

J. W. Taylor, P Duchata, Ark. 



*Deceased. 

128 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

1903. 

Lois Allen, P Sylvester, Ga. 

Etta May Hines, P. (Mrs. C, R. Flick) Nashville, Tenn. 

Haidee MeKenzie, P. (Mrs. — . — . ) Macon, Ga. 

Hattie Mitchell, P. (Mrs. P. M. Stevens) Ft. Logan, Colo. 

Verdie Thompson, P. (Mrs. R. C. Stevens) St. Augustine, Fla. 

Una Webb, P. (Mrs. John Oates) Charlotte, N. C. 

Daisy Wilson, P St. Augustine, Fla. 

1904. 

P. Hutchinson, P. (Mrs. T. P. Anderson) Atlanta, Ga. 

*Nellie Howell, P Greenville, Ga. 

Martha O. Stevens, P. (Mrs. P. E. Glenn) Lexington, Ga. 

Martha R. Tilson, V. (Mrs. W. Wilson) Atlanta, Ga. 

1905. 

Camille Callaway, P Madison, Ga. 

Allie Hayes, P. (Mrs. N. Richardson) Toccoa, Ga. 

Ida Kohn, P. (Mrs. Simon Brown) New York, N. Y. 

Myrtice Vickery, P. (Mrs. Dr. F. Campbell) Atlanta, Ga. 

Mary Craft Ward, P Atlanta, Ga. 



1906. 



i 



Sara Mays, P Monticello, Fla. 

Maude Wilson, P. (Mrs. W. H. Wells) Gaffney, S. C. 

Ida Blocker, P. (Mrs. V. V. Bailey) Blakely, Ga. 

Bessie Morris, P Ft. Gaines, Ga. 

Emily Spence, P Camilla, Ga. 

1907. 

Elizabeth Parker, P Thomasville, Ga. 

Nettie Ginsberg, P Mossy Head, Fla. 

Mary Caldwell, P Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Mattie Crowell, P Dawson, Ga. 

Leola Le Rosen, P Shreveport, La. 

Ala Peterson, P Ailey, Ga. 

Clarence Houser, P. (Mrs. S. F. McCormick) .... Fort Valley, Ga. 

Hertha Anderson, P Richton, Miss. 

Bessie Burnett, P. (Mrs. Harry Faucelet) Savannah, Ga. 

Lillian Bradley, P Adairsville, Ga. 

Lallah Dorrah, P Macon, Miss. 

Florence Jones, P Dawson, Ga. 

* Deceased. 

129 



li RE N'A U COLLEGE BULL E T 1 X 

1908. 

Wenonah Bell, A Locust Grove, Ga. 

Rosa Champlin, P., V Biloxi, Miss. 

Marion Coe, P Richland, S. C. 

lily B. Copeland, P Rome, Ga. 

Sourie Glover, P Macon, Ga. 

Mary Estelle Jones, P Waynesboro, Ga. 

Reba Jordan, P Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Mary Mitchell, P Gainesville, Ga. 

Eola Matthews, A. (Mrs. C. H. Allen) Mart, Texas 

Elsie Norman, P Norman Park, Ga. 

Florette Sommer, Vi. (Mrs. Michael) Athens, Ga. 

Annie B. Smith, V. (Mrs. F. LeGrand Proctor) . . . Beaumont, Texas 
Kate Thompson, P. (Mrs. John M. Williams) Madison, Ga. 

1909. 

Pearl Brown, P Royston, Ga. 

Gertrude Leila Elliott, P Murphy, N. C. 

Elizabeth Edwards, P Saluda, S. C. 

Frances Perkins Floyd, P Savannah, Ga. 

Evelyn Green, P. (Mrs. John M. Fray) Birmingham, Ala. 

Irene Hartzog, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Georgia Rosser Hutchinson, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Willie May Knox, P Duluth, Ga. 

Leila McFarlin, V. (Mrs. E. C. Love) Quincy, Fla. 

Joe Lee Mallory, P Mallory, Ga. 

May Phillips, P. (Mrs. James Leland Mims) .... Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Alta Pearson, P. (Mrs. G. C. Livingston) Ocala, Fla. 

Norma Powe, P Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Essie Leroy Powell, P Quitman, Ga. 

Agnes Scarborough, P Tifton, Ga. 

Agnes Sperling, P. (Mrs. Louis Selverstone) .... Waynesboro, Ga. 

Lillie Bobbie Whaley, P Parrott, Ga. 

Aline Winburn, P. (Mrs. Bridges) Gainesville, Ga. 

1910. 

Annie Cobb Andrews, P. (Mrs. V. J. Adams) Atlanta, Ga. 

Regina Calvert, P Brownwood, Texas 

Mae Carnog, P Lavonia, Ga. 

Vicie Mae Copeland, V Atlanta, Ga. 

Miriam Cauble, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Melissa Davis, P Elberton, Ga. 

Ethel Edwards, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Elizabeth Hudgins, V. (Mrs. Palmer Simpson, Jr.) .... Toccoa, Ga. 

Carolyn Jordan, P. Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Grace Johnson, P Winterville, Ga. 

130 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Lidie McDougald, A Ocala, Fla. 

Willie Bell Morris, P Samson, Ala. 

Grace McNair, P Fernandina, Fla. 

Eudora Noell, P Winterville, Ga. 

Pearl Osborn, A. (Mrs. Candler McEver) Gainesville, Ga. 

Frances Pearce, P Montgomery, Ala. 

Amy Patterson, V Lake Charles, La. 

Susie Rushing, P Ennis, Texas 

Lillian Roberts, A Valdosta, Ga. 

Edith Smith, P Goodwater, Ala. 

Pearl Talbot, P Brownwood, Texas 

Constance Wimberly, P Bainbridge, Ga. 

Zelda Warfield, O., P. (Mrs. E. D. Philips) Fernandina, Fla. 

Tommie Walters, P Lavonia, Ga. 

1911. 

Sara Lee Alford, P. (Mrs. Faye Adams) Hartwell, Ga. 

Mary Italine Argo, P. (Mrs. M. H. Gardiner) Columbus, Ga. 

Freddie Lee Bargeron, P Waynesboro, Ga. 

Johnny Corinne Bennett, P Dublin, Texas 

Ouida Brannen, P Statesboro, Ga. 

Lola Ethelene Blalock, P. Certif Hoschton, Ga. 

Stella Searcy Browne, P. Certif Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Maude Alma Baxley, P. Certif Dothan, Ala. 

Cleo Carriker, P Molena, Ga. 

Floried Cave, A. (Mrs. Ben W. Sexton) Barnwell, S. C. 

Mae Cochran, P Boston, Ga. 

Anna Cornelia Cheney, P. Certif Shellman, Ga. 

Miriam Cauble, V. Certif Greenville, S. C 

Beulah Cunyus, V. Certif Rome, Ga. 

Winnie Carter, V Gainesville, Ga. 

Ethel Mary Edwards, P Hampton, Ga. 

Ruby Ellis, P Kissimmee, Fla. 

Frances Isabel Evans, P Montgomery, Ala. 

Ruth Epsy, P Buford, Ga. 

Katherine Austen Furman, P. Certif Clemson, S. C. 

Augusta Geer, P. Certif Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

Margaret Gay, V. (Mrs. — . — . ) Franklin, N. C 

Frank Murray Harris, P Cordele, Ga. 

Pearl Laurine Hassell, P., Or Madison, Fla. 

*Frances Leslie Heinen, V. (Mrs. — . — . — ) . . . Jennings, La. 

Haddie Brown Kelly, P. Certif Monticello, Fla. 

Mary Mitchell, P Gainesville, Ga. 

Mabel Moore, P Union Springs, Ala. 

Rachael Martin, P Madison, Fla. 



*Deceased. 

131 



B RE N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Thoraasine Moody, P. Certif. (Mrs. W. L. Green) . . . Plant City, Fla. 

Rachael Martin, V Madison, Fla. 

Rebecca Elizabeth Moss, P. Certif Royston, Ga. 

A lline Mathherson, P. Certif Hartwell, Ga. 

Elleighfare Muse, P. Certif. (Mrs. — . — . ) . . . Albany, Ga. 

Orline O' Daniel, V. (Mrs. E. S. Shorter) Eufaula, Ala. 

Lilly May Pettyjohn, V Cristobal, Canal Zone, Pan. 

Annie Louise Pagett, P. (Mrs. H. L. Rudolph) Gainesville, Ga. 

Elize Rentz, P Bamberg, S. C. 

Nellie May Reece, V Rome, Ga. 

Margaret Smith, P Bartow, Ga. 

Jessie Swain, P. Certif. (Mrs. J. H. Reeve) Americus, Ga. 

Susie Mason Smith, V. (Mrs. J. D. Collins) Gainesville, Ga. 

Ruth Teasley, P. Certif Bowman, Ga. 

Wilma Twitty, P. Certif Pelham, Ga. 

Frank Jackson Watson, P. Certif Winterville, Ga. 

Jewell Whaley, P. Certif Molena, Ga. 

1912. 

Lucile Adair, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Edith Adair, Vi. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Kate Anderson, P. Certif Watkinsville, Ga. 

Georgia Ursula Blitch, P. Certif Statesboro, Ga. 

Sallie Jewell Bond, P. Certif Danielsville, Ga. 

Mamie Berger, V. (Mrs. — . — . ) Atlanta, Ga. 

Isabel Maude Chrisler, P Demorest, Ga. 

Mary Evelyn Fitzpatrick, V. (Mrs. Hartford Green) . . Zebulon, Ga. 

Madge Hicks, P., V. Certif Savannah, Ga. 

Virginia Hinton, P Reynolds, Ga. 

Mrs. L. P. Husbands, P. Certif Moultrie, Ga. 

Nellie Newton Kilgore, P. Certif Winder, Ga. 

Alline Little, P. Certif Carnesville, Ga. 

Nellie Laing, V Dawson, Ga. 

Phoebe Laing, P. Certif. (Mrs. E. B. Mosley) . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Ruth Anne Mitchhell, P. Certif Toccoa, Ga. 

Constance Modjeska Miller, V Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Nan Osborne, P. Certif Anderson, S. C. 

Harriett Henrietta Rose, P Mattoon, 111. 

Grace Ragan, Vi Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Sara Ross, A. (Mrs. Albert S. Dozier) Columbus, Ala. 

Ethel Shepard, P Gretna, Fla. 

Marie Brown Smith, P. Certif Dublin, Ga. 

Norma Smith, P. Certif Wadley, Ga. 

Irene Rutledge Stuart, P. Certif Jacksonville, Fla, 

Pauline Wright Smith, V Dublin, Ga. 

Willie Kate Travis, P. Certif Atlanta, Ga. 

Pauline Trimble, P. Certif Moultrie, Ga. 

132 



BRENAU COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Hettie Marjorie Woods, V Meridian, Miss. 

Mary Melissa Carson, P. Certif Kissimmee, Fla. 

Mary Wheeler, P Prosperity, S. C. 

1913. 

Montine Alford, P. Certif. (Mrs. — . — . ) . . . Hartwell, Ga. 

Jessie Barfield, P. Certif Pinehurst, Ga. 

Lula Adele Barnette, P. Certif. Moss Point, Miss. 

Myrtle Sinclair Bennett, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Louise Boyd, Vi Palatka, Fla. 

Velma Cartwright, P. Certif Terrell, Texas 

Eula Leone Denton, V Jennings, Fla. 

Helen Dumas, P. Certif Marietta, Ga. 

Ellen T. Edmunds, P. Certif Accomac, Va. 

Ruth Elgin, P. Certif Meridian, Miss. 

Mary Louise Ervin, P. Certif Ocala, Fla. 

Kathleen A. Evans, A Montgomery, Ala. 

Sally Waddell Evans, V., P. Certif Montgomery, Ala. 

Lucie Ferguson, V., P. Certif Donna, Texas 

Ethel Bird Haycraft, P Ocala, Fla. 

Erin Holder, P. Certif Jefferson, Ga. 

Mabel Kanouse, P Terrell, Texas 

Blanche Eleanor Loftain, V Asheville, N. C. 

Opal Overpack, V Marshall City, Iowa 

Ellin Lucile Pace, P. Certif Shawnee, Okla. 

Iona Lena Peterman, P Dothan, Ala. 

Clifford Pyles, P. Certif. (Mrs. L. D. Cullum) .... Batesburg. S. C. 

Gladys Reeves Rhodes, P. Certif Athens, Ga. 

Mary Rebecca Rogers, P. Certif Ft. Valley, Ga. 

Vera Rountree, P. Certif Summit, Ga. 

Theresa Sommer, P. Certif Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Mamie Louise Tuten, P. Certif Jesup, Ga. 

Laura McWhorter, P. Certif Stevens, Ga. 

Jack Charlton Ward, V Beaumont, Texas 

Irene Woolven, P. Certif Abbeville, Ga. 

1914. 

Edith Allen, P Rome, Ga. 

Alice M. Bate, P Monroe, Fla. 

Kathleen Bearden, P. Certif Madison, Ga. 

Ethel M. Beasley, P. Certif Atlanta, Ga. 

Theresa Beets, P. Certif Paolo, Kas. 

Lucy Bell, P. Certif Cairo, Ga. 

Eula Boggs, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Laura Belle Bostwick, P. Certif Arlington, Ga. 

Fannie Webb Branch, P. Certif Bishop, Ga. 

133 



B R E N A U COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Etta Burney, P Moultrie, Ga. 

Ruth Collins, P. Certif Abbeville, Ga. 

Kate Cone, P Macon, Ga. 

Susie M. Dozier, P. Certif Dawson, Ga. 

Ethel Dunn, P. Certif Thomasville, Ga. 

Ellen Edmonds, P Accomac, Va. 

Helen Estes, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Isabel Evans, V Montgomery, Ala. 

Frances C. Ferguson, P Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Adelaide Hargrett, P Tifton, Ga. 

Fay Hutchinson, P. Certif Monticello, Ga. 

Eunice Johns, V Baldoc, S. C. 

Marie King, P. Certif White Plains, Ga. 

Mae Meadows, P Swainsboro, Ga. 

Mamie Weaver, P. (Mrs. Robt. L. Milam) Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert L. Milam, P. Certif Atlanta, Ga. 

Mamie Miller, P Gainesville, Ga. 

Ruby Neal, P Gainesville, Ga. 

Elizabeth Patterson, P. Certif Dawson, Ga. 

Jennie Belle Perry, P Union Springs, Ala. 

Alice Pitchford, V Gainesville, Ga. 

Gladys Rhodes, P Athens, Ga. 

Mamie Lou Rodgers, P. Certif Comer, Ga. 

Helen Rosser, P. Certif Cordele, Ga. 

Inez Spencer, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

1915. 

Gladys Ascher, V Jackson, Mississippi 

Laura Lew Bosworth, V Senoia, Ga. 

Maye Boyd, P. Certif Palatka, Fla. 

Elizabeth Bocage. A Houma, La. 

Bertha Gardner, P. Certif Elberton, Ga. 

Lillian George, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Gertrude Gower, V Gainesville, Ga. 

Vivian Glausier, P. Certif Baconton, Ga. 

Laura Harris, P. Certif Dalton, Ga. 

Varina Little, P Eatonton, Ga. 

Irma Lowe, P. Certif Key West, Fla. 

Elizabeth Martin, P. Certif Atlanta Ga. 

Rosa Mathews, P. Certif Prattsburg, Ga. 

Mary McArthur, P. Certif Cordele, Ga. 

Mamie Miller, P. Certif Gainesville, Ga. 

Katherine Muse, P Albany, Ga. 

Rubye McGaughey, P Atlanta, Ga. 

Marion Phillips, P. Certif Atlanta, Ga. 

Katherine Pyles, V Ocala, Fla. 

Henrv Stewart, P Fitzgerald, Ga. 

NetaStuckey, P Blakely, Ga. 

Margaret Torrey, V San Francisco, Calif. 

134 






UN ,VERS^OF.tUNO.S-UBBANA 




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